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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook area reports: domestic 1972
Year 1972, Volume 2 (1972)

Butterman, William C.
Idaho,   pp. 215-224 PDF (924.4 KB)


Page 215

  215The Mineral Industry of Idaho 
This chapter has been prepared under a cooperative agreement between the
Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the Idaho Bureau of
Mines and Geology for collecting information on all minerals except fuels.
By William C. Butterman' 
The value of Idaho's mineral production in 1972 was 106 million, ~% below
its value in 1971. Silver was again the leading mineral commodity, accounting
for 23% of the State's mineral revenues, in spite of a sharp drop in output
due to a disastrous fire at the Sunshine mine. As in the past, the next most
valuable commodities, were lead, zinc, sand and gravel and phosphate rock.
The first three of these accounted for 40% of the total production value.
The quantity of lead and zinc produced declined by 8% and 14%, respectively;
however, owing to higher prices, the value of lead produced remained essentially
the same as in 1971, and the value of zinc output dropped only 5%. Sand and
gravel was down 32% in quantity and 10% in value. The combined value of nine
other 
commodities listed individually in table 1 decreased 9% but the value of
the remaining items increased 10% compared with values in 1971. 
 Mining companies in the Coeur d'Alene district funded a year-long study
by the University of Idaho on revegetation of ground areas covered by mine
wastes. A variety of grasses, shrubs, and trees were tested. It was planned
to follow the study with a large-scale demonstration project in Shoshone
County, which would be a cooperative effort of the sponsoring mines and the
University.2 The University began 
 1 Physical scientist, Division of Nonferrous Metals—Mineral Supply.
 2 The Wallace Miner. "Mining Corporations, 
Working Through Greater Shoshone, Inc., Doing 
Part To Revegetate Area." V. 66; No. 34, Sept. 
7, 1972, p. 2. 
Table 1.—Mineral production in Idaho' 
1971 
1972 
Mineral 
Quantity 
Value (thousands) 
Quantity 
Value (thousands) 
Antimony ore and concentrat&short tons, antimony content - - 
Clays thousand short tons 
Copper (recoverable content of ores, etc.) short tons -Gemstones        
                             Gold (recoverable content of ores, etc.) troy
ounces-Lead (recoverable content of ores, etc.) short tons -Mercury 76-pound
fiasks~. 
Peat thousandshorttons~Sand and gravel do. 
Silver (recoverable content of ores, etc.)thousand troy ounces - 
Stone thousand short tons - 
Tungsten ore and concentrate (60% WOs basis) - short tons - 
Zinc (recoverable content of ores, etc.) do - - - 
Value of items that cannot be disclosed: 
 Cement (portland and masonry), fluorspar (1971), garnet, iron ore, lime,
perlite, pumice, phosphate rock, vanadium, 
and values indicated by symbol W                 
Total                                      Total 1967 constant dollars  
 857 
 W 
3,776 NA 
3,596 
66,610 
1,057 
 W 
11,279 
19,140 
4,149 
 25 
45,078 
 XX 
$817 
 W 
3,927 
 100 
 148 
18,384 
 309 
 W 
11,437 
29,590 
6,118 
 66 
14,515 
. 
26,869 
 345 
 57 
2,942 
 NA 
2,884 
61,407 
 161 
7,696 
14,251 
3,094 
 W 
38,647 
 XX 
$303 
415 
3,013 
105 
169 
18,459 
 35 
 ~ 
10,294 
24,012 
7,042 
 W 
13,720 
28,639 
XX 
XX 
112,280 
95,472 
XX 
XX 
106,206 
p88,353 
 Preliminary. NA Not available. W Withheld to avoid disclosing individual
company confidential data, included with "Value of items that cannot be disclosed."
XX Not applicable. 
 1 Production as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production
(including consumption by producers). 


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