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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Harris, Keith L.
Tin,   pp. 1209-1225 ff. PDF (1.7 MB)


Page 1209

Tin 
By Keith L. Harris1 
 Free world supply of tin exceeded consumption by about 7,000 long tons in
1972. World mine production of tin for 1972 was 239,602 long tons, up from
232,232 kmg tons in 1971. U.S. consumption of primary and secondary tin taken
together decreased 1% for the year, with primary tin consumption increasing
3% and secondary consumption decreasing 14%. The ma$or uses for tin were
in solder, 32%; tinplate, 31%; bronze and brass, 14%; chemicals including
tin oxide, 6%; and babbitt, 4%. Tin, as the mineral cassiterite (SnO2), is
mined and smelted at many places around the world, almost totally outside
the United States. Most of the nation's tin, in the form of slabs, bars,
and ingots, came from Malaysia and Thailand. Less than 100 long tons of tin
were mined in the United States during the year, all from mines in Colorado
and Alaska. About onequarter of the tin used in the United States in 1972
was reclaimed from scrap in about 85 secondary smelters located across the
country. 
 The only primary tin smelter-refinery currently operating in the United
States is 
the Texas City, Tex., facility of Gulf Chemical and Metallurgical Corp. The
smelter received 4,216 long tons of tin-inconcentrate from Bolivia's State-owned
Corporacfon Minera de Bolivia (COMIBOL). In addition to concentrates, the
smelter processed tin wastes for secondary recovery. 
 The Lost River Mining Corp., which has been conducting an evaluation of
its fluorite-tin-tungsten deposit on Alaska's Seward Peninsula, has revised
upward its tin reserves in one zone to just under 80,000 long tons. An additional
110,000 long tons have been claimed or indicated in two other zones of the
property. 
 The General Services Administration disposed of no tin from the strategic
stockpile through commercial channels, but 361 long tons were shipped to
Turkey under programs of the Agency for International Development (AID).
 The average New York price for prompt delivery of Straits (Malaysian) tin
in 1972 was 177.469 cents per pound. This 
 "Physical Scientist, Division of Nonferrous, Metals. 
Table 1.—Salient tin statistics 
(Long tons) 
1968 
1969 '  
1970 
1971 
1972 
United States: 
'  
Production: 
Mine                         
W 
W 
W 
W 
W 
Smelter                          
 Secondary                       Exports (including reexports)          
   Imports for consumption: 
Metal                        
 Ore (tincontent)                   
Consumption: 
 Primary                         
 Secondary                       Price: Straits tin, ' in New York, average
cents per pound                       
World production: 
Mine                                 Smelter~._                         
3.458 
22,495 
4,495 
57,358 
2.489 
58,859 
28,102 
148.111 
228,332 
229,564 
345 
22,775 
2,903 
54,950 
57,730 
23,060 
164.485 
225,725 
225,290 
NA 
20,001 
4,452 
50,554 
4,667 
52,957 
20,880 
174.136 
228,500 
223,696 
4,000 
20,096 
2,262 
46,940 
3,060 
51,980 
17,970 
167.844 
232,232 
231,901 
4,000 
20,180 
1,134 
52,451 
4,216 
58,506 
15,527 
177.469 
239,602 
286,185 
NA Not ' available. W ' Withheld to avoid disclosing individual company confidential
data. 
1209 


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