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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Petkof, Benjamin
Mica,   pp. 783-791 ff. PDF (752.3 KB)


Page 783

  783Mica 
By Benjamin Petkof' 
 Scrap and flake mica production reached the highest output ever recorded
in the United States during 1972. Only a minor quantity of low-quality sheet
mica was produced during the year in only one State. Ground mica production
increased in both quantity and value. All exports of mica 
dedined in quantity but increased in value. Imports of unprocessed and processed
sheet increased, and scrap imports declined. The domestic consumption of
all forms of sheet mica varied little from that of the previous year. 
Table 1.—Salient mica statistics 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
United States: 
Sold or used by producers: 
 Sheet mica thousand pound& - 
 Value thousands. - 
Scrap and flake micathousand short tons. - 
 Value thousands... 
 Ground mica thousand short tons... 
15 
W 
125 
$3,014 
111 
W $3 
133 
$2,893 
125 
- - 
- - 
119 
$2,527 
115 
17 
$7 
127 
$2,917 
120 
14 
$7 
160 
$4,353 
- 128 
Value thousands... 
$7,072 
$8,058 
$7,350 
$8,280 
$8,844 
Consumption, block and film 
  thousand pounds... Value thousands. - 
Consumption, splittings - thousand pounds... 
 Value thousands. 
 Exports thousand short tons. 
 Imports for consumption do -- - 
World: Production thousand pounds.. 
1,628 
$2,591 
4,785 
$2,010 
14 
5 
346,513 
1,498 
$2,595 
5,077 
$2,196 
6 
5 
367,635 
1,299 
$2,058 
5,214 
$2,254 
9 
6 
360,768 
1,301 
$2,259 
4,177 
$1,818 
8 
7 
375,554 
1,207 
$2,026 
4,324 
$1,771 
7 
5 
440,016 
W Withheld to avoid disclosing individual compan 
y confidential 
data. 
DOMESTIC PRODUCTION 
 Sheet Mica.—Slightly over 7 short tons of sheet mica, valued at $7,000,
was produced in Colorado during 1972. The production consisted of low-value
punch and circle mica. The outlook for any large future production of any
quality of sheet mica remained small. 
 Scrap and Flake Mica.—The production of scrap and flake mica reached
an alltime high of 159,536 short tons valued at $4,353,313. This was an increase
of 26% in quantity and 49% in value. North Carolina was the major scrap and
flake producing State with almost 57% of total production. The remaining
output came from Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Georgia, New Mexico, Pennsylvania,
South Dakota, 
and South Carolina. Flake mica was obtained primarily by the beneficiation
of material from pegmatite and kaolin deposits. The domestic output of scrap
and flake was processed to small particle size mica for various industrial
end uses. 
 Ground Mica.—Sales of ground mica increased 7% in both quantity and
value over those of 1971. Dry-ground mica accounted for 80% of total sales.
Sixteen companies, operating a total of 20 plants, processed scrap and flake
to a small particle size; of these plants, 14 produced dryground mica; 3,
wet-ground; and 3, both wet- and dry-ground. 
 1 Physical scientist, Division of Nonmetallic Minerals. 


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