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The craftsman
Volume XXXI, Number 3 (December 1916)

Picture fireplaces: illustrating stories for sitting room, library and nursery,   pp. 247-253 PDF (2.5 MB)


Page 252


PICTURE FIREPLACES
Rip
Van
Winkle
design
in
tile
for
the
face
of
a
hall
fireplace.
Persian gardens, that is to form copings about a bed of flowers.
When a garden's path is outlined with highly colored tiles about six
inches in height, when the path is inlaid with the same bright tile, then
the garden is beautiful even in the winter time. Perhaps the original
use of tile in gardens came from the lack of flower color during most
of the year. Surely next to the living color provided by the flowers,
no more attractive way of beautifying the garden could be conceived.
In the West we have seen pools for the garden lined with bright blue
tile. In such "mirrors of the sky" there is no need for aquatic
plants,
because the color shimmers and changes with every breath of wind as
it touches the water.
   A suggestion for the introduction of color in the city streets may
be found in the use of medallions set in concrete window boxes. It is
a simple matter to make such window boxes at home. The tile is held
in place by wire nails against the inside of the mold, that should be
filled with concrete. The liquid concrete flows around these tiles
(which are made exceptionally rough on the back), and are thus
firmly incorporated in the box. This is also a good method of intro-
ducing color in plant tubs.
   For window boxes and plant tubs there are great varieties of tile
in both high and low relief, in rectangular, triangular, geometrical
252


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