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The craftsman
Volume XXVII, Number 6 (March 1915)

Rustic furniture and garden shelters,   p. 696 PDF (428.6 KB)


Page 696


RUSTIC FURNITURE AND GARDEN SHELTER
U±U IIlKUKX¥ RUbTIC, FURNITURE AND GARDEN FITTINGS SHOWN ON THE
CRAFTSMAN GARDEN FLOOR.
FURNITURE AND
SHELTERS
HERE is a curiously appealing and
        picturesque quality about rustic
        work. More than any other type
        of wood furniture or architecture
 it seems to hold the spirit of the forest. Its
 sturdy lines recall the solidly built cabins
 and rough chairs and benches of the pio-
 neer.  Its frankly   uncivilized surface,
 whether stripped of bark or left with the
 original brown covering of nature, con-
 jures up visions of the woods from which
 it came, and the irregular decorative designs
 to which the logs and branches lend them-
 selves so readily suggest the friendly infor-
 mality of the woodlands.
   It is no wonder, therefore, that rustic
work is popular around our country homes,
for both porch and garden, and fortunately
it is possible to obtain today furnishings
and shelters of almost any kind-from the
simplest chairs and tables to the most elab-
orate tea house or bungalow.
  One of the most satisfactory forms of
rustic work we know of is the hickory, a
696
group of which we are reproducing here.
These furnishings and garden structures
are made from sturdy young hickory sap-
lings, cut in the fall so that the bark will
adhere to them, and the various parts of the
frame are mortised firmly together.
   In addition to the chairs, armchairs and
rockers, the long settles and swinging seats
that add such a livable air to porch, sun-
room and garden, there are taborets and
tables of various shapes and sizes, suitable
for innumerable uses around the home-
some to hold ferns and flowers, others that
are just the thing for sewing, and others
still that are handy for books and maga-
zines or for the serving of afternoon tea.
  Rustic arches and arbors with inviting
seats, gates and fences with trelliswork of
branches, pergolas, bridges, and sundials
can all be had in portable condition, ready
to put in place wherever they are needed
in the garden scheme. And it is ev.en pos-
sible to order an entire portable log bunga-
low of this character, which can be put up
for the summer in some woodland place and
taken down and stored away until the fol-
lowing season.
RUSTIC
GARDEN


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