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The craftsman
Volume XXVII, Number 5 (February 1915)

Byers, Charles Alma
What two thousand dollars will accomplish in building a comfortable home,   pp. 571-573 PDF (1.3 MB)


Page 571


TWO THOUSAND DOLLARS FOR A SIMPLE HOME
THE BUNGALOW HOME OF MR. R. H,
ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, DESIGNED BY
ARCHITECT, AND COSTING ONLY $2,000.'
BUILDING A COMFORTABLE
HOME: BY CHARLES ALMA
BYERS
Photographs by the Author.
T has often been declared that an attrac-
    tive house need not cost any more than
    an unattractive one. This seems es-
    pecially true of the bungalow, for there
is no type of building that lends itself more
easily to economical and at the same time
beautiful construction.  Our   California
architects, particularly, have proved this in
their many successful designs. They seem
instinctively to appreciate the decorative
possibilities of their materials. In the ex-
teriors they use brick and stone, cement,
shingles and timbers, always in a way that
brings out the natural beauties of texture,
coloring and form. And in the design and
finish of interior woodwork and structural
features, they work along equally simple
and artistic lines. In the arrangement of
the rooms, too, they evince a delightful
originality without being at all -eccentric,
and by solving each problem from an in-
dividual standpoint they manage to achieve
a remarkably distinctive and homelike re-
sult. And all this they accomplish at a sur-
prisingly reasonable outlay.
   The home-builder, therefore, who seeks
economy as well as comfort, finds it worth
while to study California bungalow plans,
and the one presented here serves as an ex-
cellent illustration of the principles that un-
derlie most of the buildings of this general
type.
  This charming little five-room home cost
only $2,000 to erect, and when one notes its
many admirable points one wonders how
it could have been built for such a com-
paratively small sum; for it is not only
pleasing in appearance, both outside and
within, but also substantially constructed
and well equipped.
  In style it has all the characteristics of
the Western bungalow-a roof that is al-
most flat, wide eaves, rough sturdy timbers,
and generous window groups. The outside
walls are shingled, and the masonry work is
of brick and cement, while a white composi-
tion is used for the roof. The main wood-
work of the exterior is stained a dark
brown, with white trim, and these, together
with the red brick, white cement and white
roofing, produce an interesting color scheme.
   There is a small front porch and a per-
gola on one side, both of which have cement
steps and flooring. In the rear is the usual
screened porch with its stationary wash
tubs.
   The interior is very compact and cozy in
 its arrangement. The living room, in front,
 contains a chimneypiece of old-gold brick,
 with a built-in bookcase on one side and a
 seat on the other. The top of this seat is


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