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The craftsman
Volume XXVII, Number 5 (February 1915)

Indoor gardening: how to keep summer the year round,   pp. 520-529 PDF (3.5 MB)


Page 529


INDOOR GARDENING
dales, rivulets, paths and driveways can quickly be created and
destroyed until the desired effect has been decided upon. Little
rstic bridges, lanterns, boats and tiny houses may be bought from
almost any Japanese store if one is unable to make the little models
at home. Bits of artificial flowers, pine seedlings, mosses, quickly
grown grasses, tiny sticks and twigs can produce the effect of a garden.
This miniature garden planning will prevent many a mistake in actual
gardening, suggest many ideas that might have been one or two years
in forming. A garden can be built, approved or rejected in a day.
   The kitchen porch, enclosed in glass, heated with an extension
of pipe from the house heating system, can be made to grow enough
lettuce, radishes, parsley and similar small vegetables to keep
the table supplied with fresh greens. This is of especial value to
people who live away from the city markets, and the cost of such
an enclosure is very trifling considering the pleasure obtained. After
the lettuce and radishes have been gathered the seeds may be sown
for the spring garden, thus making sure the chances of an early
garden. Tomato plants can be matured fully six weeks earlier by
starting them in some such indoor room. The business side of
growing vegetables for market, of course, is very small unless special
greenhouses are constructed for the purpose; but one's own table
can be provided with three or four crops in a winter if desired, by
using a little indoor garden room.
   The allotted space of flower and vegetable garden can be quickly
determined and planned to scale, paths, pools, fences, pergolas and
                                               all. Besides the use-
fulness of such a
table for grown-ups
it affords one of
the most delightful
pastimes for the
children of the
family. All chil-
dren like to make
gardens, love to
handle little things.
One corner of the
greenhouse bench
could be given over
to instructive and
entertaining g a r -
ALL PALMS AND FERNS REQUIRE MUCH AIR AND FULL LIGHT: THEY    uceniilg gamies
i   or
CAN ONLY BE GROWN THEREFORE WHERE A HIGH DOME IS POSSIBLE.    children.
529


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