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The craftsman
Vol. XXIII, Number 2 (November 1912)

Book reviews,   pp. 246-248 PDF (1.5 MB)


Page 247


BOOK REVIEWS
you feel as if they both belong to you.
There's the love story (woven around the
making of a dictionary) of a girl and a man
whom she wanted to help in his struggle
against his own weakness-a story that
makes you long to "mold things nearer to
the heart's desire." Then there's a passage
between a German-American and his col-
lege-bred son which sets forth the struggle
between old ideals and new ambitions with
a sense of tragedy that is almost heart-
breaking. And the hero of still another tale
-"The Anarchist: His Dog"-is a small
boy with a morning paper route, who de-
fends his disreputable but beloved mongrel
with a fierceness that is as tender as it is
amusing.
  A book like this wakes one to a keener
sight of the wonderful possibilities of ex-
istence, and fills one with a sense of com-
radeship for all humanity-not merely hu-
manity in the abstract, but in all its throb-
bing, aching, struggling reality. (Published
by Frederick A. Stokes Company, New
York. 257 pages. Price $i.oo net.)
FRESH AIR AND HOW TO USE IT:
BY THOMAS S. CARRINGTON, M.D.
T HE healthfulness and pleasure of out-
      door living and sleeping have come to
      be so widely recognized during the
past few years, among medical and archi-
tectural circles and homemakers generally,
that an authoritative work on this subject
will find a ready welcome. Illustrated with
many photographs, floor plans and dia-
grams, and handled in a brief but compre-
hensive way, this bool presents just that
practical working knowledge which is need-
ed by those who wish to provide open-air
accommodation in their homes. Among the
phases of the subject which are treated are
those of ventilation, window tents, roof
bungalows, wall houses and iron frame
porches for city use, temporary fresh-air
porches for the country, permanent sleeping
porches and loggias for country homes,
methods    of protecting 'and   screening
porches, tents and tent houses, open-air bun-
galows and cottages, the planning of new
houses with open-air apartments, roof play-
grounds for children, as well as clothing,
bedding and furniture for the various kinds
of fresh-air living and sleeping. (Published
by The National Association for the Study
and Prevention of Tuberculosis, New York.
241 pages. Profusely illustrated. Price
$i.oo.)
WOOD AND FOREST: BY WILLIAM
NOYES
T HIS book, which was prepared as a
     companion volume to "Handwork in
     Wood," by the same author, is the
result of an attempt "to collect and arrange
in available form useful information, hith-
erto widely scattered, about our common
woods, their sources, growth, properties
and uses." As such it will certainly be
welcomed by woodworkers, cabinetmakers
and all who may be interested in the nature
and use of this friendly and adaptable ma-
terial.
  The contents include, in addition to a
general bibliographical list, chapters on the
structure and properties of wood, the prin-
cipal species of American woods, the dis-
tribution and composition of the North
American forests, the forest organism, the
natural enemies of the forest and also its
exhaustion and use. As each section is
systematically arranged, the facts concisely
put and a generous supply of photographs,
maps and sketches used for illustration, the
volume should prove an invaluable refer-
ence work for every technical library and
woodworker's table.   (Published by The
Manual Arts Press, Peoria, Ill. 309 pages.
Profusely *illustrated.  Price, postpaid,
$3.00.)
SOCIAL     LIFE    IN    THE    INSECT
WORLD: BY J. H. FABRE: TRANS-
LATED FROM THE FRENCH BY
BERNARD MIALL
E   VEN    the   most  confirmed   insect-
hater, having once opened this un-
     usual book and read a few sentences
of its fascinating contents, must be com-
pelled to lay aside those prejudices which
have hitherto closed his eyes to the marvels
of the insect world, and admit a new inter-
est and wonder at the dramatic picture that
is unveiled for his delectation. For here,
between the covers of an attractive and
well illustrated book, the man whom Mau-
rice Maeterlinck has called "the insects'
Homer" has bared for the lay reader's
contemplation the joys and struggles, the
loves and hatreds of insect life.
   In language that has a literary and
human quality which not every scientist
can command, this great French entomolo-
gist unfolds before our widening gaze "the
most extraordinary tragic fairy play that
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