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Digital Library for the Decorative Arts and Material Culture

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The mirror of the graces; or, the English lady's costume: combining and harmonizing taste and judgment, elegance and grace, modesty, simplicity and economy, with fashion in dress; and adapting the various articles of female embellishments to different ages, forms, and complexions; to the seasons of the year, rank, and situation in life: with useful advice on female accomplishments, politeness, and manners; the cultivation of the mind and the disposition and carriage of the body: offering also the most efficacious means of preserving beauty, health, and loveliness. The whole according with the general principles of nature and rules of propriety
(1811)

The same subject, of female beauty, more explicity [sic] considered,   pp. 42-58 ff.


Page 52


.52        MIRROR OF THE GRACES.
  What is said against white paint, does not
oppose, with the same force, the use of red.
Merely rouging leaves three parts of the
face and the whole of the neck and arms to
their natural hues. Hence the language of
the heart, expressed by the general com-
plexion, is not yet entirely obstructed. Be.
sides, while all white paints are ruinous to
health, (occasioning paralytic affections and
premature death) there are some red paints
which may be used with perfect safety.
  A little vegetable rouge tinging the cheek
of a delicate woman, who, from ill-health or
an anxious mind, loses her roses, may be ex.
cusable ; and so transparent is the texture of
such rouge, (when unadulterated with lead)
that when the blood does mount to the face, it
speaks through the slight covering, and en-
hances the fading bloom. But, though the
occasional use of rouge may be tolerated, yet,
my fair friends must urderstand that it is only
tolerated. Good sense must so preside to its
application, that its tint on the cheek may
always be fainter than what nature's pallet
would have painted. A violently rouged wo-


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