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Jones, Owen, 1809-1874. / Examples of Chinese ornament selected from objects in the South Kensington Museum and other collections.
(1867)

Description of the plates,   pp. 9-15 ff.


Page 14


DESCRIPTION OF THE PLATES.
PLATE LXXI.
From a painted china Jar. The principle of
composition on this bottle is the same as on Plates
LXX. and XLVI., only the continuous line runs
horizontally instead of spirally round the bottle, and
the repeat is moved one-half a division, so as to
bring the flowers into triangles.  To compose a
pattern which shall do this, and thoroughly and
evenly fill up the space, is not easy, and is only
attained by the Oriental instinct.
PLATE LXXII.
Portions of the painted china Jar described on
the last plate; the ornament in the centre of the
plate is from the lid of the jar.
PLATE LXXIII.
From painted china Vases. The upper border
on this plate is a curious specimen of a continuous
stem running round the vase, and throwing off a
light and a dark flower side-by-side; in the centre
of each flower is the Chinese emblem of the labyrinth.
PLATE LXXIV.
From a painted china Bottle. In the upper
border, which is from the neck of the bottle, the
different patterns are united; but in the lower
pattern, from the swell of the bottle, the composi-
tions are entirely fragmentary, and yet so contrived
that the ornament is very evenly distributed over
the ground.
PLATE LXXV.
From a painted china Bottle. This composition
is in the mixed style. The main steins are continu-
ous, and embrace all the flowers; but there are dis-
tributed over the surface detached emblems, uncon-
nected with the composition.
PLATE LXXVI.
From a painted china Vase. A composition on
the continuous-stem principle.
PLATE LXXVII.
From a painted china Bottle. A composition
in the fragmentary style. Pure Chinese in character.
PLATE LXXVIII.
From a painted china Bottle. This composition
is so completely after the Persian and Indian
manner, that it would require no other change than
to be coloured after the Indian or Persian scheme of
colouring to be an Indian or Persian work.
14
PLATE LXXIX.
From a painted china Bottle. This composition
is very interesting. One main stem winds round
the base of the bottle, throwing up stems and
branches fitting into the shape to the top of the
bottle, where a change of colour of the ground only,
accentuates the neck of the bottle. In colour, form
and line, it is entirely Chinese.
PLATE LXXX.
From a painted china Bottle. The observations
we have made on Plate LXXVIII. apply equally to
this composition. It is Indian in form and line,
and is Chinese only in its colouring.
PLATE LXXXI.
From a very large Cistern in cloisonn6 enamel.
This magnificent composition is in every way Chinese,
and is the very perfection of conventional ornamenta-
tion, perfect in distribution of form and colour.
PLATE LXXXII.
From a painted china Vase. A very fine ex-
ample of detached or fragmentary ornamentation.
PLATE LXXXIII.
From a painted china Vase.  Similar style to
the last, but more perfect; in the balance of the
masses, the embossed ground is formed of a con-
tinuous line of volutes.
PLATE LXXXIV.
From a painted china Vase. This style is still
more fragmentary: the compositions are entirely de-
tached in its general effect; it is yet very elegant.
As before, the embossed ground is continuous.
PLATE LXXXV.
From painted china. The upper example is from
a Basin; the lower is from a portion of a Vase.
PLATE LXXXVI.
Portion of a painted china Dish: four dragons
guarding the labyrinth form the subject of the com-
position, the flowers are most artistically arranged in
the fragmentary style.
PLATE LXXXVII.
From a painted china Bottle. This is another
of those compositions such as are described on Plates
LXXX. and LXXVIII., which are Chinese only from
their scheme of colourinu.


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