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Jones, Owen, 1809-1874. / The grammar of ornament
(1910)

Ornament of savage tribes,   pp. 13-17 ff.


Page 13


CHAPTER I.-PLATES 1, 2, 3.
ORNAMENT OF SAVAGE TRIBES.
PLATE I.
1. Cloth. Otaheite.-UNrTED SERVICE MUSEUM.
2. Matting from Tongotabu, Friendly Islands.
3. Cloth. Otaheite.-U. S. M.
4. Cloth. Sandwich Islands.-U. S. M.
5-8. Cloths. Sandwich Islands.-BRITISH MUSEUM.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Cloth Matting from Tongotabu, Friendly Islands.
Cloth. Otaheite.-U. S. M.
Cloth. Sandwich Islands.-B. M.
Cloth.
Cloth made from Paper Mulberry, Feejee Islands.-B. M.
PLATE II.
1. South America.-UNITED SERVICE MUSEUM.
2. Sandwich Islands.            U. S. M.
3. Owhyhee.                     U. S. M.
4. New Hebrides. Inlaid Shield. U. S. M.
5. Sandwich Islands.            U. S. M.
6. South Sea Islands.           U. S. M.
7, 8. Sandwich Islands.         U. S. M.
9,10. Tahiti. Adze.
11, 12. Friendly Islands.
13, 14. Tahiti. Adze.
15. Sandwich Islands.
16, 17. New Zealand.
18-20. Sandwich Islands.
Drum.
U.S.-l.
U.S. M.
U.S.M.
UI S. M.
U.S. M.
IJ.S. M.
PLATE III.
Owhyhee. Club.-UNITED SERVICE MUSEUM.
Sandwich Islands. Club.     U. S. M.
New Zealand. Patoo-Patoo. U. S. _M.
Tahiti. Adze.               U. S. M.
New Zealand. Paddle.        U. S. M.
6. New Zealand. Pajee, or War Club.
7. South Sea Isles. War Club.
8. Handle, full size of Fig. 5.
9. Feejee Islands. Club.
FROM the universal testimony of travellers it would appear, that there is
scarcely a people, in however
early a stage of civilisation, with whom the desire for ornament is not a
strong instinct. The desire is
absent in none, and it grows and increases with all in the ratio of their
progress in civilisation. Man
appears everywhere impressed with the beauties of Nature which surround him,
and seeks to imitate to the
extent of his power the works of the Creator.
Man's earliest ambition is to create. To this feeling must be ascribed the
tattooing of the human face
and body, resorted to by the savage to increase the expression by which he
seeks to strike terror on his
enemies or rivals, or to create what appears to him a new beauty.* As we
advance higher, from the
* The tattooing on the head which we introduce from the Museum at Chester
is very remarkable, as showing that in this very
barbarous practice the principles of the very highest ornamental art are
manifest, every line upon the face is the best adapted to
develope the natural features.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
U.S. M.
U.S. M.
U.S. M.
U.S. M.
- - -
13
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