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Stickley, Gustav, 1858-1942. / Craftsman homes
(1909)

An outline of furniture-making in this country: showing the place of craftsman furniture in the evolution of an American style,   pp. 151-159


Page 159

       FURNITURE MAKING IN THIS COUNTRY
                            II
more expressive of our character as a people
than imitations of the traditional styles, and
a conviction that the best way to get some-
thing better was to go directly back to plain
principles of construction and apply them to
the   making   of simple, strong, comfortable
furniture that would meet adequately every-
thing that could be required of it.
  Because Craftsman furniture expresses 50    (lecorative i(lea will ultimately
take place.
clearly the  fundamental sturdi-
ness and directness of the true
American point of view, it fol-
lows that in no other country
and under no    other conditions
could    it have  been  produced
at the   present  day.  The  his-
tory    of art shows   us that a
new form of expression never
develops from the top and that
nothing permanent is ever built
Ul)Ofl  tradition. When   a style
is found to be original and vital
it is   a certainty  that it has
sprung from the needs of the
plain people and that it is based
upon     the simplest  and most
direct principles of construction.
This    is always the  beginning
and a style that has in it suffi-
cient   vitality to  endure, will
grow naturally as one worker
after another feels that he has
something    further to express.
In making Craftsman furniture
~ve went back to the beginning,
                                         seeking the inspiration of the same
law of
                                         direct   answer to need  that animated
  the
                                         craftsmen of an earlier day, for
it was sug-
                                         gested by the primitive human necessity
of
                                         the common folk.   It is absolutely
plain and
                                         unornamented, the severity of the
style mark-
                                         ing  a point  of (leparture from
which   we
                                         believe  that a rational (levelopment
of the
a
SERVING TABLE AND TWO OF THE LIGHTER DINING CHAIRS, SUITABLE FOR A DINING
EDOM  Tea
MORE MASSIVE FURNITURE: UPHOLSTERED WITH LEATHER.
SMALL TO TAKE THE
LARGE SIBEIIOARD THAT IS USUALLY MADE IN OAK FINISHED IN A VERY
LIGHT TONE OF BROWN, WITH FULLS AND HINGES IN BULL, BROWNISH
COPPER, FORMING A DECORATIVE EFFECT.
59


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