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Stickley, Gustav, 1858-1942. / Craftsman homes
(1909)

A convenient and well-equipped kitchen that simplifies the housework,   pp. 142-143


Page 143

    A CONVENIENT AND WELL-EQUIPPED KITCHEN
planning such a house it should come in for
the first thought instead of the last and its use
as a dining room as well as a kitchen should
be carefully considered.  The hooded range
should he so devised that all odors of cooking
are carried off and the arrangement and ven-
tilation should he such that this is one of the
best aired and sunniest of all the rooms in the
house.
  Where social relations and the demands of
a more complex life make it impossible for the
house mistress to do her own work and the
kitchen is necessarily more separated from
the rest of the household, it may easily be
planned    to meet the  requirements of the
case without losing any of its comfort, conven-
ience, or suitability for the work that is to
be done in it.  Modern science has made the
task very easy by the provision of electric
lights, open plumbing, laundry conveniences,
and hot and cold running water, so that the
luxuries   of the properly arranged  modern
kitchen would have been almost unbelievable
a generation ago.  Even if the kitchen is for
the servant only, it should be a place in which
she may take some personal     pride. It is
hardly going too far to say that the solution
of the problem of the properly arranged kitch-
en would come near to being the solution also
of the domestic problem.
  The properly planned kitchen should be as
open as possible to prevent the accumulation
of dirt.  Without the customary Œglory holes²
that sink and other closets often become, gen-
nine cleanliness is much easier to preserve
and the appearance of outside order is not at
all lessened.  In no part of the house does the
good old saying, ³a place for everything and
everything in its place,² apply with more force
than in the kitchen.   Ample cupboard space
for all china should be provided near the sink
to do away with unnecessary handling and the
same cupboard, which should be an actual
structural feature of the kitchen, should con-
tain draxvers   for  table linen, cutlery and
smaller utensils, as well as a broad shelf which
provides a convenient place for serving.  The
floor should be of cement and the same ma-
terial may be used in tiled pattern for a high
wainscot, giving a cleanly and pleasant effect.
RANGE SET IN A RECESS TO BE OUT OF THE WAY AND WORIC TALI.E PlAcED JUST BELOW
A GROUP OF WINDOWS.
FLOOR PLAN.
Pitoi~snea ~n i ne Craftsman, September, I9~)5.
143


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