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Stickley, Gustav, 1858-1942. / Craftsman homes
(1909)

The living room: its many uses and the possibilities it has for comfort and beauty,   pp. [unnumbered]-136


Page 136

              THE LIVING ROOM
of cosiness as can be got in the recesses of a
large room can never be attained in a small
one.  But if your big room is to be comfort-
able, it must have recesses.  There is a great
 charm in a room broken up in plan, where
that slight feeling of mystery is given to it
which arises when you cannot see the xvhole
room from any one place in which you are
likely to sit; when there is always something
around the corner.²
  \Vhere  it is possible, the   structural feat-
ures  that actually exist   in  the framework
should be shown and made ornamental, for
a room that   is structurally   interesting and
in which the woodwork and color scheme are
good  has  a  satisfying quality   that  is not
dependent upon pictures     or bric-a-brac and
needs but  little in the way    of furnishings.
Only such furniture as is absolutely necessary
should be permitted in such a room, and that
should be simple in character and made to
harmonize with the woodwork in color and
finish.  From first to last the room should be
treate(l  as  a whole.   Such  furniture as is
needed for constant use may be so placed that
it leaves plenty of free space in the room and
when once     placed  it should be  left alone.
Nothing so much dlistnrbs the much dlesired
home atmosphere as to make frequent changes
in the disposition of the furniture so that the
general aspect of the room is undergoing con-
tinual alteration.  If the room is right in the
first place, it cannot be as satisfactorily ar-
ranged in any other way.      Everything in it
should fall into place as if it had grown there
before the room is pronounced complete.
WINDOW SEAT IN A LIVING ROOM.  THE GROUP OF WINDOWS WITH THE SEAT BELOW EXTENDS
ACROSS THE ENTIRE
END OF THE FOOM AND THE TWO ENDS OF THE SEAT ARE FORMED BY THE SMALL SQUARE
BOOKCASES BUILT INTO
THE CORNERS.
~Œ
PuWished in The Craftsman, January, 1906.
136


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