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Stickley, Gustav, 1858-1942. / Craftsman homes
(1909)

The living room: its many uses and the possibilities it has for comfort and beauty,   pp. [unnumbered]-136


Page 135

                 TilE lIVING ROoM
cupboards, shelves, or high casement \vindO\V5
so arrange(l as to be an integral part of the
structure.   The  chimnevpiece strikes a  rich
color<note with its bricks or tiles an(l glowing
copper hood, au(l the woo(lwork. \vaIl spaces
an(l (lecorative scheme are naturally brought
into harmony with it.   or l)erhaps the doiiti<
nant  featnre  may be the staircase,  with its
broad landing an(l  well<designed balustrade
or it may be a group of windows so placed
that it makes possible j list the right arrange-
ment of the wall spaces an(l comlflan(is the
best  of  the view.  (~)r if living room  an(l
dining  room   are practically one, the  main
point of interest may be a sideboard, either
built into a recess or, with its cupboards on
either side an(l a row of casement windows
above, occupying the entire end of the room.
  Any commaudin~ feature in     the strnctnrc
of the room itself will naturally take its place
as this center of interest; if there are several,
the  (llIest1oI~ ot relative iml)ortance will be
easily settled, for there can be only one domi-
nant point in a well planned room.   The Eng-
lish thoronghly understand the importance of
this an(l the charm of their houses (lepeuds
largely upon the skilful arrangement of inter-
esting strnctural features aronnd one center
01 attention to which everything else is sub-
ordinate   Also     the English understand  the
charm of the recess in a large room.      Their
feeling regarding    it is well expressed  by a
prominent English architect of the new school
who writes:      i¹d any people have a feeling that
there is a certain cosiness in a small room
entirely unattainable in a large room ;  this is
a mistake  altogether; quite the   reverse has
been my experience. which is, that such a sense
Published in The Craftsman   April, 191
FIREPLAcE IN A LIVING ROOM.  THE SOUARE MASSIVE dHIMNEYPIEcE IS BUILT OF
HARD-BURNED RED BRIcK LAID
UP IN DARK MORTAR WITH \VIDR JOINTS.   THE MANTEL SHELF AS ILLUSTRATED HERE
IS OF RED CEMENT, BUT A
THIcK OAK PLANK WOULD BE EQUALLY EFFECTIVE.    THE HOOD 15 OF COPPER AND
THE FIREPLACE IS BANDED WITH
WROUGHT IRON.   THE PANELING ABOVE THE BOOKCASES GIVES AN INTERESTING DIVISION
OF THE WALL SPACES.
1.95


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