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The craftsman
Volume XXXI, Number 3 (December 1916)

Book reviews,   pp. 296-18a PDF (4.5 MB)


Page 299


BOOK REVIEWS
than a servant. Determining to lead a
more personal, freer and happier life she
goes her own way. Her adventures in
freedom are told with the same spirit that
brought "Ships that Pass in the Night"
into such quick favor. (Published by
Frederick A. Stokes Company, New York.
31o pages. Price, $1.35 net.)
THE MOTHERCRAFT MANUAL: BY
MARY L. READ, B. S.
Y OUNG mothers will find in this book
     much valuable information on the
     care and feeding of children, and
much sage advice upon their education. The
manual is written by the Director of the
School of Mothercraft, New York City,
a school opened in 1911 for the purpose of
working out experimentally a training
course for young women. (Published by
Little, Brown and Company, Boston,
Mass. Illustrated. 44o pages. Price,
$1.25 net.)
EDIBLE AND POISONOUS MUSH-
ROOMS: BY WILLIAM ALPHONSO
MURRILL: A. M., PH.D.
T HIS brief handbook by the distin-
     guished mycologist of the New York
     Botanical Gardens will be welcomed
by all students and lovers of the outdoor
world. Knowledge of the edible mush-
rooms should be possessed by every
camper.   Boy Scouts and Woodcraft
Girls are being taught to identify the
more common of our mushrooms. Often
when gun and rod fail, a knowledge of
edible mushrooms would be life-saving.
Hundreds and thousands of pounds of
valuable and most delicious food goes to
waste annually because people cannot
tell the good from the dangerous varieties.
This book, with its fine colored chart of
the most familiar edible and poisonous
species, puts practical information in the
hands of all people who love outdoor life,
who like to know the names and value of
the beautiful things in our woods and
fields. (Published by the author.)
THE    MEN    WHO    WROUGHT:      BY
RIDGWELL CULLUM
FOR those who have enjoyed Mr. Cul-
     lum's "The Night Riders" and "The
     Way of the Strong," there will be
 new pleasure in this thrilling submarine
 story of love and adventure. Since the
 interest of war stories in general is so ab-
sorbing at present, this with its new op-
portunity for adventure, the submarine,
will be welcomed. (Published by George
W. Jacobs & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 418
pages. Price, $1.35 net.)
CLOTHING FOR WOMEN: BY LAURA
I. BALDT, B. S.
T HIS book is the first to appear in a
     new series to be known as "Lippin-
     cott's Home Manuals." This series,
according to the publishers' announce-
ment, is expected to become "of trans-
cendental economical value to women in
every walk of life." Miss Baldt's experi-
ence as instructor in the department of
textiles and clothing in Teacher's College,
Columbia University, has enabled her to
present in concise form a wealth of in-
formation relative to the choosing and
buying of fabrics, and the making of pat-
terns of all kinds of clothing. There are
many illustrations showing how to make
different stitches, hems, seams, how to
hemstitch, embroider, etc. In brief the
book presents practical working direc-
tions for the designing and construction
of women's garments, including all the
fundamental principles involved therein,
making the book of use to women who
wish to make their own clothes, as well as
to teachers in the department of practical
arts.- (Published by J. B. Lippincott
Company, Philadelphia and London. 454
pages. Illustrated. Price, $2.oo net.)
THE WOODCRAFT         MANUAL: BY
ERNEST THOMPSON SETON
"t'1'HERE is a winding deer trail by a
  . stream in the pine woods, and the
       glint of a larger breadth of water
 through the alders, with stars in the grass,
 a high shady rock for the nooning, and a
 bell-bird softly chiming."
   If any boy or girl in this land wishes to
 walk the trail leading to this enchanted spot,
 and wishes to "discover the folksiness of
 a tree, the all-aboutness of some secret, the
 worthwhileness of the swamp, or the
 friendship of a frog-pond," let him join the
 Woodcraft League founded by Ernest
 Thompson Seton. The purpose of this
 League is to learn the pleasant ways of the
 woods and of life, "that we may be mas-
 ters of ourselves, face life without flinch-
 ing, be ready to take our part among our
 fellows in all problems which arise, to build
 up our bodies and strengthen our souls."


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