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The craftsman
Volume XXXI, Number 3 (December 1916)

Book reviews,   pp. 296-18a PDF (4.5 MB)


Page 297

BOOK REVIEWS
intinse emotion, with beauty and with the
kind of conviction that reestablishes
romance in the world. It does not matter
much how the story ends, but it matters
immensely that Galsworthy can make you
understand the beauty of love among the
humble people, the splendid thing that
devotion to the land can be, and the value
of inspired capability for devotion which
is the soul of every nation that is going
to survive. (Published by Charles Scrib-
ner's Sons, New York. 412 pages. Price,
$1.35 net.)
THE INDIAN FAIRY BOOK: FROM
THE ORIGINAL LEGENDS
SIXTY years ago the great ethnologist,
    Henry R. Schoolcraft, published a
    collection of stories once told to In-
 dian children by their mothers long years
 ago. These delightful tales of fairy
 magic and fun have for some unaccount-
 able reason become almost lost to us save
 as they have been kept alive in an occa-
 sional copy treasured in some apprecia-
 tive family.
   But it is now again possible for our
 children to laugh at the merry tale of the
 youth Maidwa who could outrun his own
 arrow, so swift of foot was he, of Osseo,
 son of the Evening Star, of the Fire-
 Plume, and of Bokewa, the humpback.
 To our children these are bedtime rather
 than camp-fire tales, but the little boy
 who snares the sun in a net made of his
 sister's jet black hair, and the Toad-
 Woman so fond of bright red snake-ber-
 ries, will give the same delightful thrills
 of mystery and adventure.
   A charming group of fairy tales that
 children cannot help but like. (Published
 by Frederick A Stokes Co., New York.
 Illustrated in color by Florence Choate
 and Elizabeth Curtis. 303 pages. Price,
 $1.5o net.)
 BIRD    HOUSES-HOW         TO   BUILD
 THEM: BY A. NEELY HALL
 W E have several times had the pleas-
         ure of reviewing the practical
         handbooks of A. Neely Hall. His
  books on "Homemade Toys for Girls and
  Boys," "The Boy Craftsman," "Hand-
  craft for Handy Boys" and "The Handy
  Boy" have found their way into a great
  many homes and schools.      In "Bird
  Houses and How to Build Them," he
  gives minute directions illustrated with
A WOODPECKER'S NESTING BOX.-FROM "BIRD HOUSES-
  -HOW TO BUILD THEM." BY A. NEELY HALL.
many line drawings of bird houses made
from boxes, bits of rustic, flower pots,
etc. He tells boys how to make bird
baths, bird shelters and gives a valuable
table of the dimensions for the making of
bird houses. A most excellent chart to
place in the hands of boys who do not
know what to do with themselves in the
winter months    and  summer   vacation.
(Published by A. Neely Hall, Cincinnati,
Ohio. Pamphlet. Price 25c postpaid.)
TWENTY-FIVE       BIRD   SONGS    FOR
CHILDREN: BY W. B. OLDS
"It was the warbling of the birds
Which first gave man the thought of music."
                        CLAUDE DEBUSSY.
 W ITH this thought of Debussy's in
        mind Mr. Olds began the composi-
        tion of a number of songs suitable
 for children's use based upon bird calls. In
 writing this series of songs he has attempted
 to accomplish two things: first, to write songs
 that would prove an appeal to children,
 that will inevitably lead them to a keener
 delight in the singing of birds, and an in-
 terest in the whole subject of bird life, and.
 secondly, to interest musicians, particularly
 composers of children's songs, in the possi-
 bility of utilizing bird themes. Here, he
 feels, is a vast, untouched field, the re-
 sources of which are practically inexhaust-
 ible. In these twenty-five songs he has


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