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The craftsman
Volume XXVII, Number 5 (February 1915)

Moulton, Robert H.
A mountain palace for our presidents,   pp. 494-497 PDF (1.5 MB)


Page 497


     A MOUNTAIN PALACE FOR OUR PRESIDENTS
HE finest view from Mount Falcon, however, lies to the west.
      Granite cliffs drop perpendicularly into a wooded valley.
      Thence the eyes follow   a   billowing succession of green
mountain ledges, spreading out like waves of the sea and mounting
gradually higher and higher until they reach a climax in the snow-
covered peaks of the distant Rockies.
   As the sun goes down in the West the landscape becomes a vast
sweep of beauty-the sky above opal, amethyst, topaz, turquoise
or aquamarine, and a hundred ridges displaying every shade of green,
from the bright emerald of the mountain meadows to the tourmaline
depth of the pines.
   Mount Falcon is not one of the high peaks of the Rockies, but is
some hundreds of feet higher than Denver. It lies about midway
between the extreme foothills on the east and the Continental
Divide. Within sight on clear days is Mount Evans, fourteen
-tousand, Lnree nunarea ana twenty-one reet high, or more than
two hundred feet loftier thanPike's Peak. Mount Evans is crowned
with a perpetual snow, and chill exhalations from it and other heights
cool Mount Falcon and lesser peaks in its vicinity..
    The mountain scenery visible from Mount Falcon is beautifully
 diversified by water. No less than seventy lakes are discernible
 from its summit. At its base winds Bear Creek, a typical Rocky
 Mountain trout stream.
    The natural loveliness of the scene is, according to the plans,
 to be enhanced by a magnificent system of approaches and terraces
 which will soften and adorn a thousand-foot precipice which the
 castle will overlook on one side. It is planned to make the castle a
 distinctive and impressive edifice, which will nevertheless be ex-
 ceedingly attractive and comfortable.  Ample quarters will be
 provided for the President's family, his attendants, secretaries and
 assistants.
   To make the project national, or at least Western, its promoters
plan to raise by popular subscription the funds necessary to erect
the castle and construct its approaches. The building, according to
present plans, is to be held in trust by the Governors of the twenty-
two States westof the Mississippi River, all of whom have enlisted
as official sponsors of the undertaking.
   The plan, as suggested, will make Mount Falcon the permanent
summer residence of the Presidents, and will be for a portion of each
year the center of the American Government. Important govern-
mental news would bear a Colorado date line instead of those of the
District of Columbia, or New York, or Massachusetts, or New
Hampshire.
497


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