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The craftsman
Vol. XVII, Number 3 (December 1909)

Stickley, Gustav
Rapid growth of the garden city movement, which promises to reorganize social conditions all over the world,   pp. 296-310 PDF (5.4 MB)


Page 304


    GROWTH OF THE GARDEN CITY MOVEMENT
cities and suburbs which should combine the advantages of town
and country; adding to this a practical working plan by which these
cities and suburbs might be built largely by the tenants themselves,
and arranging that all revenues, over and above a certain fixed per-
centage set aside to pay the bonded indebtedness, should be used
for the development of the city, suburb or village as the case might be.
   Too wise to risk failure by attempting too much, Mr. Howard
resolved to concentrate all the thought and attention of the com-
pany which was formed to carry out his idea, upon a single experi-
ment that should be sufficiently large to be at once attractive and
resourceful, and yet not too large to be handled like any business
enterprise. This decision resulted in the founding of the first Gar-
den City about six years ago at Letchworth, in Hertfordshire. The
planning of the Garden City by Messrs. Barry Parker and Raymond
Unwin and its subsequent rapid growth and complete success are
matters of general knowledge, but in this country it is probable that
few people realize how the garden city idea has spread over England,
France and Germany and how the work of the organizers has been
aided by the establishment of the Copartnership Tenants' Society.
This last development is most important because it represents the
cooperation of the people themselves, without which no permanent
reform can take place.
   The chief object of the promoters of the garden city idea has been
to bring about a spontaneous movement of the people back to the
land by creating conditions that will give them the advantages of
city and country life combined, and to keep the whole thing on an
economic basis that will afford comfort and prosperity to people of
very moderate means. This is done by purchasing a tract of un-
developed agricultural land and building upon it a town or village
FOUR HOUSES IN ONE, SHOWING DIGNIFIED
EFFECT OF GROUPING: DESIGNED BY MICHAEL
BI'NNEY AND C. C. MAKINS, AA.R.I.B.A.
304


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