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The craftsman
Vol. XVII, Number 3 (December 1909)

Stickley, Gustav
Rapid growth of the garden city movement, which promises to reorganize social conditions all over the world,   pp. 296-310 PDF (5.4 MB)


Page 303


     GROWTH OF THE GARDEN CITY MOVEMENT
 effort to reorganize life and work has for the most part failed to take
 deep and permanent root in the minds of the people. Something
 was needed to crystallize the situation and, judging from the develop-
 ment of the past few years, that one thing has been supplied by the
 garden city movement as it exists today.
   The best working plan for the development of what are called
garden cities, suburbs and villages, is found in England, because
about ten years ago Mr. Ebenezer Howard wrote a little book en-
titled "Tomorrow," in which he offered for consideration-not a
new proposition, but one formed from the strongest features of three
old ones. He took the idea of an organized migratory movement
of population from Wakefield and Prof. Marshall; added to this the
system of land tenure proposed by Thomas Spence and afterward, with
modifications, by Herbert Spencer, and completed the scheme by adopt-
ing the main points of the plan for a model city, published nearly fifty
years ago by James S. Buckingham. By the combination of these
three propositions Mr. Howard evolved the commonsense scheme
of developing along sound economic lines the building of garden
WORKMEN'S COTTAGES IN HAMPSTEAD WAY:
EACH COTTAGE CONTAINS TWO DWELLINGS:
DESIGNED BY JOSEPH & SMITHEM.
                           303


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