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Gustav Stickley (ed.) / The craftsman
Vol. XII, Number 3 (June 1907)

Quigley, Jane
Picardy: a quiet, simple land of dreamy beauty, where artists find much to paint,   pp. 255-[264] PDF (2.7 MB)


Page 256


PICARDY: A QUIET, SIMPLE LAND
Mrs. C. Eastlake, and others; and it attracts a sprinkling of repre-
sentative American artists as well as students. The usual plan is
to live in rooms or studios, and go for meals to the Hotel des Voy-
ageurs or Hotel Joos -unpretentious hostelries with fairly good
meals,ý served in an atmosphere of friendliness and stimulating
talk.- In winter the place is deserted, except by a group of serious
workers who make it their home. Artists pay about twenty-five
or thirty francs a week for board, and rooms and studios are cheap.
Anyone who is lucky enough to find a place at the Villa Riant Sdjour,
facing the river, will find a Parisian landlady-the embodiment
of joie de vivre and good sense, who keeps her house in spotless
order.
E   TAPLES has been called-and not without reason-a dirty
     little town, but it is healthy for all that, and endears itself
     to many who work there. The artistic sense finds pleasure
in its winding cobbled streets, and mellow old houses, and in the
dark-complexioned southern looking people. Models are plentiful,
and pose well for a small payment either in the studio, or in the
picturesque gardens that lie hidden behind the street doors.
   A. great source of interest is the fishing fleet that comes up the
estuary of the Cauche to the quays where the fisher people and
shrimpers live in a colony of their own. There is constant work
for the sketch book, especially on Monday, when the boats go off
for several days, the whole family helping the men and boys to
start. All one can do amid this bewildering movement of boats
putting up sail, and people bustling about with provisions, is to
make hurried notes and sketches. Near Etaples is the lovely forest
of Le Tonquet, where one can work in absolute quiet, with vistas
of the river, the sandy coast and the sea beyond.
   And this forest at Le Tonquet has a splendid character of its
own. Many of the trees being young, the effect is light and fairy-
like compared with older forests where giant trees shut out the sky.
The soil is sandy and the ground undulating, so high in parts that
one can look down upon Etaples and the sea coast as it stretches
far away toward the horizon. Great variety characterizes the trees
-dark pines are relieved by light poplars and willows and silver
birches, so that the general effect is that of tender green, touched
with gold and silver. Here and there the carpet of moss and pine
needles is overgrown by gorse and brambles, and there are long
avenues and open spaces, peculiarly beautiful in spring and autumn.
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