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Sloan, Samuel, 1815-1884 / Sloan's homestead architecture, containing forty designs for villas, cottages, and farm houses, with essays on style, construction, landscape gardening, furniture, etc. etc.
(1861)

Design VIII.: model residence for a physician,   pp. 106-110 ff.


Page 108

 108
              HOMESTEAD ARChITECTURE.
 acknowledged intelligence, and winle many may dis-
 pute his taste, but few can find fault with his judg-
 ment: an investigation of the plan of his dwelling will
 go far to sustain us in the latter allegation.
   ACCOMMODATION .- The front entrance is effected
 through the end veranda H, fig. 44, into the hall A,
 12 by 21 feet, which, besides containing the staircase,
 is ample enough for a small company to resort to for
 conversation in the pleasant days of summer: being
 provided with a fire-place, it would be an excellent
 place at any season for the entertainment of such
 visitants as are too unscrupulous with regard to the
state of their boots to be admitted to the parlor.  So
much for the hall.  On the left, as we enter, we ob-
serve B, 17 by 15 feet, one of the cosiest little parlors
that you can well imagine; just the right size to enter-
tain all your country acquaintances in, that might feel
slighted by being invited to the dining-room.     This
apartment, designated by the letter C, is 15 by 20 feet.
Beyond is a snug little chamber D, 12 feet square: this
would perhaps be the best apartment for an office;
change the window next the veranda, 11, to a door,
and we have at once an entrance for the admission of
such patients as might prefer coming to see the
"doctor" instead of his visiting them. A possible, but
less convenient location for an office would be on the
second floor, over the hall; a serious objection to this,
however, would be the abuse of the l)ril~cipal stairs, and
especially the stair carpets.  The kitchen E is 15 by
12 feet, and entered from the front hall or the dining-
room at pleasure, and has a back door, as every kitchen
ought to have; but, by a little inattention, no steps
have been provided for it, much less any shelter which


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