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The journal of design and manufactures
(1852)

[Original papers:] Examples of medieval patterns.,   pp. 121-122


[Original papers:] A trades collection of imports and manufactures, by Professor Solly.,   pp. 122-124


Page 122

122       Original Papers: A Trades Collection of Imports, &c. 
Designers for woven fabrics may obtain a useful hint or two from these 
patterns. In both they will observe a certain geometrical arrangement; an
absence of any direct imitation of nature; a developement of the charac-
teristics of the process and material; and no attempt at shadowed ornament.
(2.) Needlework Pattern. 
A TRADES COLLECTION OF IMPORTS AND MANUFACTURES, BY PROFESSOR SOLLY. 
THE accompanying letter recommending the formation of a trade collec- 
tion of imports, exports, and manufactures, has already been approved of
by 
some of the leading merchants of London, and has received their signature.
This docum&t has been laid before Her Majesty's Commissioners for the
Exhibition of the Industry of all Nations, and referred by them to the "Surplus
Committee :"- 
London, 16th October, 1851. 
TO THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE EXHIBITION OF THE INDUSTRY OF ALL NATIONS.
GENTLEMEN,-Understanding that Her Majesty's Commissioners propose forming
a Collection of the Raw Produce of different countries shewn in the Great
Exhibition, 
we beg leave to express our conviction of the high practical value of this
plan. 
We anticipate great benefits to merchants, manufacturers, and brokers, from
the 
formation of a great trade museum or collection, of which this would be the
founda- 
tion, and in which specimens of the natural productions or exports of all
countries 
should be deposited, together with such accurate scientific, practical, and
commercial 
information as can be procured. 
Such a museum would, at all times, give the most valuable aid to the mercantile
community, and afford that information which is so constantly required, and
which 
there is now no means of obtaining. 
We would beg to suggest that, in order to render such a collection really
available 
for trade purposes, it should be formed in the city of London, and so situated
as to 


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