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Jones, Owen, 1809-1874. / Examples of Chinese ornament selected from objects in the South Kensington Museum and other collections.
(1867)

Description of the plates,   pp. 9-15 ff.


Page 10


DESCRIPTION OF THE PLATES.
apex of a triangle, with two red flowers for a base
(the left one not being contained on the plate).
In the same way, on the right of the plate, the
light-green flower is the apex of a triangle, with
two dark-green flowers at the base.   The white
flower is the centre of the composition, and stands
alone, and yet its centre lies between two small red
flowers which form the base of a triangle having
a green flower for the apex.
PLATE XII.
Portion of the circumference of a large Bowl in
cloisonne enamel.   This composition is repeated
twice round the bowl, and the lines all spring from
the centre flower.  Although not on the formal
principle of the composition last described, the same
system of triangulation of form and colour is ap-
pareit at a glance.
PLATE XIII.
From an Incense-burner in cloisonn6 enamel.
The flowers are arranged over the surface in equi-
lateral triangles, and are crossed by stems with
volute terminations, also triangular, but less formal,
which fill up the interstices.
PLATE XIV.
This plate represents half the circumference of
a Vase in cloisonn6 enamel. The arrangement of
form and colour is most artistic.
PLATE XV.
From a cloisonng-enamelled Bowl. This com-
position is similar in principle to that of Plate XI.,
but the large flowers are more perfect in form and
detail.
PLATE XVI.
Borders from similar Vases.
PLATE XVII.
This singular composition is from the handle of
a Standard in cloisonn6 enamel, the black ground
represents the portion which is pierced (a jour).
A main stem winds round the staff, through the
large flowers, which are, as usual, triangularly
placed.
PLATE XVIII.
From  a painted china Bottle.   The general
form of this border, like that on Plate VI., has a
very Indian outline. The flowers here are also com-
10
posed triangularly, and are all united
stem, which runs round the circum
Bottle.
PLATE XIX.
From a china Dish, the pattern I
or engraved on the clay before colourii
specimen of a style of ornament of w
e- I-h r-Aln ia  n~evrieties  It+ is
more modern than the specimens already described.
We have still the instinct of triangular composition,
but it is not so decidedly marked; the centre flower
occupies more relative space, and the stems out of
which the flowers spring, instead of flowing onwards
in a series of volutes, often re-enter and return upon
themselves. This principle is essentially Chinese,
whilst the flowing line is common to the Arabian,
Moresque, Persian, and Indian styles. The border
on the edge of the dish is almost G0reek.
PLATE XX.
The same observations will apply to this plate,
which is taken from a painted china Dish. Al-
though all the groups are united, they do not, as in
the finer examples we have examined, proceed from
one centre. In this example, also, the pattern is
indented, showing that probably some mechanical
means were employed to produce it; whilst on such
Vases as Plates II., III., and V., they were freely
drawn by the hand without any mechanical aid.
PLATE XXI.
A series of Borders from various objects, in blue
and white china.
PLATE XXII.
Centre of a Plate and various Diapers, from
objects in blue and white china.  The border on
the upper portion of the plate is an interesting ex-
ample of the conventional representation of'natural
flowers symmetrically arranged; after the Persian
manner.
PLATE XXIII.
From a Bottle of blue and white china; a very
fine example of symmetrical arrangement: it is also
interesting as showing the limit of shade and relief
in the representation of flowers-a limit which the
Chinese constantly reach, but never exceed.
PLATE XXIV.
From a blue-and-white china Cistern.
noble composition, on the same principle
already described. The artistic introducti


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