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Bishop, J. Leander (John Leander), 1820-1868 / A history of American manufactures from 1608 to 1860 : exhibiting the origin and growth of the principal mechanic arts and manufactures, from the earliest colonial period to the adoption of the Constitution ; and comprising annals of the industry of the United States in machinery, manufactures and useful arts, with a notice of the important inventions, tariffs, and the results of each decennial census
Volume 3 (1868)

Manufactures of Boston,   pp. 276-312 ff.


Page 278

MANUFACTURES OF BOSTON.
Manufactures.
Sewing machine needles....
Ship building....................
Ship onithing ..................
Shirts and furnishing good
Silk fringes, trimmings, etc
Silver  w are.......................
plated ware.............
Soap and candles...............
Soapstone   ......  ..................
Stair building...................
Steam gas tubes ................
Steam heaters....................
Steam and gas pipe machin
Stoves and ranges.............
Sugar refining...................
Tin and sheet-iron ware ...
Trunks    ...........................
Type and stereotype fo ndi
Umbrellas and parasols.
Upholstering................ ....
Varnish ................
V inegar........... ................
Whalebone.......................
Wagons, carts, etc... .........
W  hips..............................
Window shades................
Wirework ....................
Total, including n iscellar
ous manufactures not abo
No. of
Establish- Capital
ments.       invested.
2          $23,500......
6......    205,000......
7......      26,300.....
9......      51,500......
4......      81,500......
2......      26,500......
6.....        9,300.
2......      16,000 ......
4......      10,900
6            11,100.
.  ......  125,900 ......
2......      50,500.
es.     2......      60,000 ......
.  ......    64,500 ......
2......     750,000......
.... 14...... 31,400......
10......      59,900......
ng      5......     96,000......
4......      24,500......
9......     122,000......
4.           90,200......
2......      12,000.
1......      10,000.
....   10.           10,500.
1             5,000
4......       2,800.
2            15,000
Raw
material.
$13,950......
267,330......
38,022......
44,735......
212,570......
48,894.......
13,146.
33,000......
9,685......
13,068......
87,034......
7,90 ......
150,350......
163,710......
1,763,500......
36,82.
153,263.
37,113....
38,300......
216,733......
174,03.
9,563......
32,000.
9,264......
22,600.....
10,220......
21,250.
Male
hands.
62......
395......
44.
7......
89......
33......
43......
17......
15......
43.
246......
18......
110.
95......
220......
67......
142.
103......
10......
209......
44......
8......
6......
28......
100......
12.
25......
Female
hands.
13......
33 ......
93......
33......
93......
17......
61......
40......
61... ...
10.
30...
2...
17...
61....
4l0...
61...
10...
1...
Value of
Product.
$53,330
760,820
72,300
189,170
324,300
130,000
55,000
50,250
19,600
.53,600
277,000
83,000
230,000
297,250
2,383,057
88,800
278,050
175,770
81,000
560,681
254,900
22,000
38,000
36,900
85,600
20,300
41,000
specified.................  ......... 1,050  $14,527,860  $20,214,277  14,100  4,993  $37,681,108
REMARKABLE IRON WORKS IN SOUTH BOSTON.
The South Boston Iron Company's Works.
Boston has a due share of manufacturing establishments that can be
called remarkable, but none more deservedly celebrated or of greater
National importance than the Works of the South Boston Iron Company,
better known as Alger's Foundries. They were founded by Mr. Cyrus
Alger, a native of Bridgwater, Massachusetts, in the year 1817, which
was not long after the Dorchester Peninsula became a part of Boston.
During the war of 1812 he supplied the Government with large numbers
of Cannon Balls; and about that time he purchased a considerable tract
of low land called the Flats, reaching to the channel, which then was
considered of little value, but which now is covered with streets, dwell-
ings, and extensive manufactories, including the works of which he was
the founder.
Mr. Alger was one of the best practical metallurgists of his day. He
discovered a method of purifying cast-iron which gave it more than
278


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