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Bishop, J. Leander (John Leander), 1820-1868 / A history of American manufactures from 1608 to 1860 : exhibiting the origin and growth of the principal mechanic arts and manufactures, from the earliest colonial period to the adoption of the Constitution ; and comprising annals of the industry of the United States in machinery, manufactures and useful arts, with a notice of the important inventions, tariffs, and the results of each decennial census
Volume 3 (1868)

Manufactures of Rochester,   pp. 258-265


Page 259

MANUFACTURES OF ROCHESTER.                                 259
No of
Establish-                Male      Female    Value of
Manufactures.                 ments.     Capital.     hands.     hands.    Product.
Jew elry  ..........................................  5......  8,350  .....  9  .....  ......  16,800
Leather....... .......................  5......  43,000.....    69......   ......  113,810
Locomotive lamps............................2    25,000.....   33......   ......   76,063
Lumber  ..........................................3   26,000......  28  .....  ......  84,340
M1achinery and steam engines (1)......  8       111,500        132 .....   ......  213,650
Mtattresses........... .................  2      13,000          5        6......  52,400
Millinery  .........................................3   7, 500......  I......  ......  26,700
Paper..............................................  1   60,000......  54   30  .....  112,500
Patent medicines..............................  2   20,000       8......  8.        65,000
Perfum ery  .......................................  1......  15,000......  1......  20   75,000
Picture  fraimes.................................4   5,100  .....  13......  ......  29,250
Planed  lumber........................  2......  21,000 .....   26......   ......   78,000
Pottery  ware....................................3   15,300     16......   ......    13,000
Printing  and  publishing..................  4......  159,000  ...  222.....  ......  2:39,420
Sashes, doors and  blinds................... ......  12,250.....  31......  ......   53,930
Saw ...................................   ............  I......  22,000  .....  16......  ......  16,000
Scales.  ........  .........  ..........................  1......  10,000......  25......  ......  64,963
Shirts and collars...................  2.....     7,000......    I......  16.       22,720
Soap  and  candles..............................  2   18,000......  10......  ......  33,920
Spokes, felloes, and hubs.............  2......  22,000......   28......   ......   40,728
Staves........................ ......................4   38,000   84......  ......  82,4.10
Therm om eters..................................  2......  3,500......  5......  6......  14,475
Tin and sheet-iron ware.............  14......   67,000......   79 .....   ......   121,720
Trunks...........................3                12,500        28        2          30,715
Whips and gloves......... ..................     10,000        33......  30......  38,250
Wood working, flour barrels, etc      39......   80,030        363      103......  272,585
Rochester is remarkable for the extent and character of its Fruit
Nurseries.      It is estimated      that there are within ten miles of tile city
not less than 4,000 acres devoted          to this culture.       A   single firm   have
a nursery that occupies 500 acres, and             is probably the largest in the
world. There are others of 350 and 250 acres each. The sale of Fruit
Trees is estimated to amount to a million of dollars annually.
(1) We have no means of verifying this return of the consus-takers, but we apprehend
that the product has been considerably under-rated. There are several large firms en-
gaged in the business in Rochester.
WILM11AM Krn & Co., for instance, manufacture Car Wheels, Steam Engines, and
especially Mill Gearing, very extensively.
D. A. Woonnunv & Co. have one of the most remarkable Steam Engine establishments
in the United States. In 1851 this firm     astonished the makers of steam     engines by
publishing and offering a list of certain sizes, ranging from ten to thirty-five horse power,
at prices much below any that had ever been heard of before. This they were enabled to
do by building a large quantity of each size at one time and confining their attention to
one article of manufacture. Their workshops are conducted upon the English plan, eseh
workman having a limited and uniform range of duty throughout the year. The prin-
ciple upon which they commenced business secured the favor of the public, and their En-
gines are so popular both in the United States and in the Canadas, that though they
designed to keep a large stock of finished Engines on band at all times, the demand has
outstripped their facilities for manufacturing. Messrs. Woodbury & Co. are about erect-
ing new and more commodious workshops.


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