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Stickley, Gustav, 1858-1942. / Craftsman homes
(1909)

The kind of fabrics and needlework that harmonize with and complete the craftsman decorative scheme,   pp. 165-168


Page 168

       CRAFTSMAN FABRICS AND NEEDLEWORK
plicitv is characteristic of all the Craftsman
needlework, which is bold and plain to a de-
gree.  XVe use appliqud in a great many forms,
especially for large pieces such as porti~res,
couch   covers, pillows and the larger table
covers.   For  scarfs, window curtains  and
table furnishings of all kinds we are apt to
use the simple darning stitch, as this gives
a delightful sparkle to any mass of color.
For the rest we   use the satin stitch very
occasionally when a snap of solid color is
needed for accenting now and then a bit of
plain hem-stitching or drawn work.  It is the
kind of needlework that any woman can do
and, given the power of discrimination and
taste in the selection of materials, designs
and color combinations, there is no reason
why any woman should not, with compara-
tively little time and labor, make her home
interesting with beautiful and characteristic
needlework that is as far removed from the
³fancy work² which too often takes the place
of it, as any genuine and useful thing is
removed from things that are unnecessary.
  For    scarfs, table squares, luncheon and
dinner sets and the like, we find that the
most suitable fabrics in connection with the
Craftsman furnishings are the linens, mostly
in the natural colors and the rougher weaves.
We use hand-woven and homespun linens in
many weights and weaves, and a beautiful
fabric called Flemish linen, which has a matt
finish and is very  soft and pliable to the
touch.   Some of these come in the cream or
ivory shades and all of them in the tones of
cream gray and warm pale brown natural
to the unbleached linen.  We find, as a rule,
that the finer and more delicate white linenz,
do not belong in a Craftsman room any more
than silks, plushes and tapestries in delicate
colorings belong with the Craftsman furni-
ttlre.   The whole scheme demands a more
robust sort of beauty,<something that pri-
marily exists from use and that fulfils ever~
reqtPrement.   The  charm  that  it possesses
arises from the completeness with which it
answers all these demands and the honesty
which allows its natural quality to show.
TABLE SCARF FOR A BEDROOM~ WITH POPPY DESIGN IN
DARNED WORK.
SAME POPPY DESIGN As APPLIED TO A BEDSPREAD OF
HOMESPUN LINEN.
POPPY DESIGN CARRIED OUT IN APPLIQUE TO ORNAMENT
THE CORNER OF A COUCH COVER.
168


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