University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Digital Library for the Decorative Arts and Material Culture

Page View

Stickley, Gustav, 1858-1942. / Craftsman homes
(1909)

The treatment of wall spaces so that a room is in itself complete and satisfying,   pp. 144-148


Page 147

           THE r1~1{EMfl\JENrF OF WALL SPACES
fully with the question of finishing interior
woodwork so that all its natural qualities of
color, texture and grain are brought out by a
process which ripens and mellows the wood
as if by age without changing its character at
all. Here it is sufficient to say that any of our
native woods that have open texture, strong
grain and decided figure,<such as oak, chest-
nut, cypress, ash, elm or the redwood so much
used on the Pacific coast,<are entirely suitable
for the woodwork of ropms in general use, and
that each one of them may be so finished that
its inherent color quality is brought out and
its surface made pleasantly   smooth without
sacrificing the woody quality that comes from
frankly revealing its natural texture.
  The first illustration (page 144)  shows a
~vainscot that is peculiarly Craftsman in de-
sign.  The panels are very broad and what
would be the stiles in ordinary paneling are
even broader.  At the top of each panel is a
niche in which may be set some choice bit of
pottery or metal work that is shown to the
best advantage by the wood     behind  it and
that serves to give the accents or high lights
to the wrhole color scheme of the room.  The
wall   space above    is of plain sand-finished
plaster that may either be left in the natural
gray or treated with a coat of shellac or wax
which carries the color desired.   The rough
texture of the plaster has the effect of seem-
ing to radiate color, while it absorbs the light
instea(l of reflectino it as  from a smoothly
polished surface, and when the color is put on
lightly enough to he a trifle uneven instead of
a (leadI solid hue without variation of any sort,
there is a ch~uice for the sparkle and play of
light  which at once adds     life and interest.
     J┬╣nblished in The  Craftsman, J tine, 1905.
TREATMENT OF PLAIN WALLS WITH LANDSCAPE FRIEZE.
Re Craftsman,  October, 1907.
WALL WITH A HIGH WAINSCOT IN WHICH THE DOOR AND WINDOW       ARE MADE A 
 PART OF THE  STRUCTURAL
DECORATION: THE LEADED PANELS IN WINDOW AND DOOR ADD MUCH TO THE BEAUTY OF
THE ROOM.
147


Go up to Top of Page