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Stickley, Gustav, 1858-1942. / Craftsman homes
(1909)

Halls and stairways: their importance in the general scheme of a craftsman house,   pp. 125-128 ff.


Page 128

               HALLS AND STAIRWAYS
RECEPTION HALL AND STAIRCASE WHERE THE LANDING PROJECTS INTO THE ROOM ALMOST
DIRECTLY OPPOSITE THE
ENTRANCE DOOR.  THIS HALL IN MOST CRAFTSMAN HOUSES IS LITTLE MORE THAN A
NOOK IN THE LIVING ROOM.
for anyone who wishes to read, work or study.
   The third illustration shows another Crafts-
man reception hail in which the staircase is the
prominent  structural  feature.   The  double
casements light stair and landing and also add
considerably to the light in the room.   Just
belo~v the stair is a comfortable seat with the
radiator hidden below, and a coat closet fills
the space between the seat and the wall.
   A larger hall that is emphatically a part of
the living room is seen in the last illustration.
Here there is no vestibule and the wide en-
trance door with the small square panes in the
upper part belong to the structural decoration
of the room.  Additional light is given from
the same side by the row of casements recessed
to leave a wide ledge for plants.  The ceiling
is beamed and the whole construction of the
room is satisfying, although interest at once
centers upon the staircase as the prominent
structural feature.  This is in the center of
the  room and has     a large square   landing
approached by three shallow steps.  The stairs
run up toward the right at the turn and the
space between steps an(l ceiling is filled with
slim square uprights, two on each step, which
give the effect of a grille, very open and very
decorative.  Opposite the stair on the landing
is a railing about the height of a wainscot
with posts above. Treated in this manner, the
staircase seems intended as much for beauty
as for utility,  and so   fulfills its manifest
destiny in the Craftsman decorative scheme.
  In a small house there are often many con-
siderations which prevent the use of the hall
as a living room.  Many people object to the
(lraughts and waste of heat entailed by the
open stairway and prefer a living room quite
separate from the entrance to the house.  In
this case it is better to omit the reception hall
and to have merely a small entrance hall,
rather than the compromise that contains no
possibility of comfort and yet is crammed with
all the features that belong in the larger hall
intended for general use.  An entrance hail of
this kind may be made very attractive and
inviting by the wise selection of the woodwork
an(l color scheme and by care in the designing
of the stairway, which of course is the prin-
cipal structural feature in any ball.
                                       -4.
Piblislied in  The Craftsman, January,   1906.
I Œ28


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