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Stickley, Gustav, 1858-1942. / Craftsman homes
(1909)

Halls and stairways: their importance in the general scheme of a craftsman house,   pp. 125-128 ff.


Page 127

               I-TAIlS ANi) STAiRWAYS
of the year  rather  than cold,  an effect ot
restful shadiness  and coolness is quite as in-
viting in its way, although it is always safe to
avoid a cold color scheme for a hail, as the
suggestion it conveys is invariably repellent
rather than welcoming.
  In England the large hall designed for the
general gathering place of the family is a fea-
ture in nearly every moderately large house,
particularly in the  country.  These English
halls are always roomy and comfortable and
in many cases are both picturesque and sump-
tuons in effect, having a certain rich stateli-
ness that seems to have descended in direct
line from the great hall of old baronial days.
In this country the hall is more apt to be a
hart of the living room, and, while quite as
homelike and inviting, is simpler in style.
  The illustration on page 125 shows the part
of a Craftsman reception hall that contains the
stairway  A small den or lounging room is
formed    liv the deep recess that appears at
one side of the staircase, which is central in
position and is completely masked, excepting
the lower steps and the landing, by the post
construction above the solid wainscot that sur-
ronn(ls it.   This wainscot turns outward to
the whith of a single panel at either side of
the stair, one sheltering the end of the seat
built in at the right side and the other partially
(lividing  off  the recess  to the  left.  So
arrange(l,  the staircase forms an  important
part of the decorative treatment of the room.
  The second illustration shows an upstairs
hall, which has somewhat the effect of a gal-
lery, as it is open to the stairway except for a
low balustrade.   This nook in the upper hall
takes the place of a sewing room or an upstairs
sitting room, and is infinitely more attractive
because of the freedom and openness of the
arrangement.    XVhile not in any sense a sep-
arate room, it still allows a certain seclusion
THE WINIJOW ON THE LANDING CARRIES OUT THE LINE OP THE UPPER \VAI.L SPACE.
P,tbl,shed in The Craftsman, January, 1906.
A STATEWAYT HAT RUNS DIRECTLY UP FROM THE LIVING ROOM AND IS USED AS A PART
OF THE STRUCTURAL DECO-
RATION.   NOTE THE LAMP ON THR NEWEL POST WHICH GIVES LIGHT TO THE SEAT BELOW
AND TIlE NAY IN XVHICII
P27


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