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Stickley, Gustav, 1858-1942. / Craftsman homes
(1909)

The effective use of cobblestones as a link between house and landscape,   pp. 102-108


Page 104

         TIlE EFFECTJVF: USE OF C OBBLESTONES
the new building art that is (leveloping so
rapidly in the West.  In these buildings the
use ot stone in this form is as inevitable in
its fitness as the grouping of rocks in a Japan-
ese gar(len, for on the one hand the construc-
tion of the house itself is usually of a character
that pernlits such  a use of  stone without
                      danger of incongruity, and
                      on the other hand the stone
                      is usually  employed  in  a
                      way that brings the entire
                      building  into  the closest
                      relationship  with  its en-
                      vironment.
                        The   cobblestones  used
                      for the houses of this kind
                      are of  varying sizes.  To
                      give the  best  effect they
                      should be neither too small
                      nor too large. Stones rang-
                      ing from two and one half
                      inches in (liameter for the
                      minimum     size to six or
                      seven inches   in (liameter
                      for the maximum size are
                      found to be most generally
                      suiitable. Such stones, which
                      belong  of  course  to  the
                      limestone variety, and are
                      irregularly   rounded,  can
                      usually be obtained \Vith<
                      out trouble in almost any
                      locality where  there   are
                      any stones at all, picked up
                      from  rocky   pasture land
                      or a dry creek bottom. The
                      tendency of builders is to
                      select the  whitest stones
                      and the most nearly round
                      that are obtainable.
                        This,  however,   applies
                      only to the regular cobble-
                      stone construction  as  we
                      know  it    in  the  East.
                      In California the (lesigners
                      are much more (laring, for
                      they are  fond   of  using
                      large mossy   boulders  in
                      connection with both brick
                      and cobbles.  The effect of
                      this is singularly interest-
                      ing both in color and form,
                      for the   warm   purplish
  brown of the brick contrasts delightfully with
  the varying tones   of  the  boulders covered
  with moss and lichen, and the soft natural
  grays  and    browns  of  the   more  or  less
  l)rimitive  wood  construction  that is almost
  invariably  used  in connection   with cobbles
  gives the general effect of a structure that
104
Published in The Craftsman, July. 1907,  GreenĀ¹ & GrenĀ¹  Architects.
A CALiFORNiA iiOU5E MODELED AFTER THE JAPANESE STYLE. WITH           HIOH
RE-
TAUiINC WALL IN WiiiCH THE USE OF COBBLESTONES HAS PROVEN ESPECIALLY
DECORATIVE.


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