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Chippendale, Thomas (1718-1779) / The gentleman and cabinet-maker's director: being a large collection of the most elegant and useful designs of household furniture in the Gothic, Chinese and modern taste.
(1754)

Plate descriptions,   pp. 7-27 ff.


Page 19

[ 19 ] 
PLATE 
LXXXIX. 
IS a Bureau Dressing-Chest and Book-Case; the middle door 
is for glass, and 
drawers or doors on each side; the top neatly carved will 
look well; the fret in 
the bottom is intended for a drawer; A is the profile of 
the design; the line B is 
the depth of the recess for the knees; the mouldings are
 at large on the right 
hand. 
PLATE XC. 
IS a Dressing-Chest (or Table) and Book-Case; the doors
 are all intended for 
glass; the fret in the bottom is for the dressing drawer; 
the lower part may be 
drawers or doors; the dimensions are all fixed to the design; 
the mouldings are all 
at large on the right hand. 
PLATE xcI. 
Is a plain Cabinet intended for Japan, the mouldings are all 
at large, and the 
sizes fixed to the design. 
PLATE 
XCII. 
IS a Cabinet. with two different feet, and only one door;
 the other without the 
door shews the design of the inside; the mouldings are 
at large, and the dimen- 
sions fixed to the Cabinet; the work that is upon the door,
is to be carv'd neatly 
out of thin sluff, and glued upon the pannel. 
PLATE 
XCIII. 
IS a Chinese Cabinet with drawers in the middle part, 
and two different sorts of 
doors at each end.  The bottom drawer is intended to 
be all in one; the di- 
mensions and mouldings are all fixed to the design.  This
 Cabinet, finished accord- 
ing to the drawing, and by a good workman, will, I am confident, 
be very genteel. 
PLATE XCIV. 
IS a Gothic Cabinet without doors; the fretwork at the
 bottom of the cabinet 
is intended for a drawer; the upper forms a sort of 
Gothic arches, supported 
by whole terms in the middle, and half-ones at the ends, 
and drawers betwixt. 
The 


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