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Observations on the theory and practice of landscape gardening: including some remarks on Grecian and Gothic architecture, collected from various manuscripts, in the possession of the different noblemen and gentlemen, for whose use they were originally written; the whole tending to establish fixed principles in the respective arts

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Repton, Humphry, 1752-1818
Observations on the theory and practice of landscape gardening: including some remarks on Grecian and Gothic architecture, collected from various manuscripts, in the possession of the different noblemen and gentlemen, for whose use they were originally written; the whole tending to establish fixed principles in the respective arts
London, England: Printed by T. Bensley and Son ... for J. Taylor, at the Architectural Library, 1803
16, 222, [2] p. front. (port.), illus., plates (part col., part fold.) plans, diagrs. 34 cm

URL to cite for this work: http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/DLDecArts.ReptonObservations

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Contents

[Cover]

[Marbled pages]

[Frontispiece] Humphry Repton

[Title page] Observations on the theory and practice of landscape gardening: including some remarks on Grecian and Gothic architecture, collected from various manuscripts, in the possession of the different noblemen and gentlemen, for whose use they were originally written; the whole tending to establish fixed principles in the respective arts., pp. [1]-[2]

[Dedication] To the king, with his majesty's most gracious permission, this work is humbly inscribed by his majesty's most faithful, obedient, and humble subject, Humphry Repton, pp. [3]-[4]

Advertisement explaining the nature of this work, pp. [5]-8

[Preface] Preface containing some observations on taste, pp. [9]-14

List of the places, pp. [15]-16

Chapter I: Introduction--general principles--utility--scale--various examples of comparative proportion--use of perspective--example from The Fort--ground--several examples of removing earth--the great hill at Wentworth, pp. [1]-8 ff.

View from the fort, near Bristol. [State A]

View from the fort, near Bristol. [State B]

[Chapter I, continued], pp. 9-14

Wentworth Yorkshire. [State A]

Wentworth Yorkshire. [State B]

[Chapter I, continued], p. 15

Chapter II: Optics or vision--at what distance objects appear largest--axis of vision--quality or field of vision--ground apparently altered by situation of the spectator--reflections from the surface of water explained and applied--different effects of light on different objects--example, pp. 16-28

Morning

Evening

[Chapter II, continued], p. 29

Chapter III: Water--it may be too naked or too much clothed--example from West Wycombe--digression concerning the approach--motion of water--example at Adlestrop--Art must deceive to imitate nature--cascade at Thoresby--the rivulet--water at Wentworth described--a river easier to imitate than a lake--a bubbling spring may be imitated--a ferry boat at Holkham--a rocky channel at Harewood, pp. 30-34

West Wycombe, Buckinghamshire. [State A]

West Wycombe, Buckinghamshire. [State B]

[Chapter III, continued], pp. 35-40

Water at Wentworth, Yorkshire. [State A]

Water at Wentworth, Yorkshire. [State B]

[Chapter III, continued], pp. 41-44

Chapter IV: Of planting for immediate and future effect--clumps--groups--masses--new mode for planting wastes and commons--the browsing line described--example Milton Abby--combination of masses to produce great woods--example Coombe Lodge--Character and shape of ground to be studied--outline of new plantations, pp. 45-48

Artificial scenery, natural scenery

[Chapter IV, continued], pp. 49-50 ff.

Browsing line. [State A]

Browsing line. [State B]

[Chapter IV, continued], pp. 51-59

Chapter V: Woods--Whateley's remarks exemplified at Shardeloes--intricacy--variety--a drive at Bulstrode traced, with reasons for its course--further example from Heathfield Park--a belt--on thinning woods--leaving groups--opening a lawn in great woods--example Chashiobury, pp. 60-64

View from the house at Shardeloes. [State A]

View from the house at Shardeloes. [State B]

[Chapter V, continued], pp. 65-66 ff.

To his grace the Duke of Portland, this map of Bulstrode is humbly inscribed

[Chapter V, continued], pp. 67-79

Chapter VI: Of fences--the boundary--the separation--example from Sheffield place--fence to plantations only temporary--the double gate--lines of fences--of roads--of walks--of rivers--all different, pp. 80-91

Chapter VII: Ferme ornée, a contradiction--farm and park distinct objects--experimental, or useful farm--beauty and profit seldom compatible, pp. 92-94

Farm and park

[Chapter VII, continued], pp. 95-98

Chapter VIII: Of pleasure grounds--flower gardens, example Bulstrode--Valley Field--Nuneham--greenhouse and conservatory belong to a flower garden--various modes of attaching them to a house--difficulty--objection--attempt to make them Gothic, pp. 99-102

Flower garden, Valleyfield

[Chapter VIII, continued], pp. 103-106

Pavillion and green house for a Gothic mansion

Chapter IX: Defence of the art--difference between landscape gardening and painting--further answer to Messrs. Price and Knight--cursory remarks on views from rooms, appropriation, extent, &c.--example from Attingham--pictures may imitate nature, but nature is not to copy pictures, pp. 107-112

Example of row of trees. [State A]

Example of row of trees. [State B]

[Chapter IX, continued], pp. 113-120

Chapter X: Of ancient and modern gardening--authors--change of style--Wimpole--terraces--at the Hasells--at Cobham--art and nature considered--example Burley on the Hill, pp. 121-132

Burley, Rutlandshire. [State A]

Burley, Rutlandshire. [State B]

[Chapter X, continued], p. 133

Chapter XI: Miscellaneous--endless variety of situation and character--first impressions--roads--example Stoke Park--scenery in Wales--example rug--ornaments--entrances--Harewood--Blaize Castle--adaptation of ornamental buildings--ornaments--decorations--colours--metals, pp. 134-162

A cottage altered, in Langley Park. [State A]

A cottage altered, in Langley Park. [State B]

[Chapter XI, continued], pp. 163-166

Chapter XII: Architecture and gardening inseparable--some inquiry into the forms and arrangements of different Æras--situation and arrangement of Michel Grove--singular character of the house--change in customs and manners alters uses of rooms--an extended plan--example Garnons--a contracted plan--example Brentry Hill, &c., pp. 167-170 ff.

Houses of various dates

[Chapter XII, continued], pp. 171-178

Michel Grove, Sussex. [State A]

Michel Grove, Sussex. [State B]

[Chapter XII, continued], pp. 179-182

Example of a plan for an extended front

[Chapter XII, continued], pp. 183-186

Villa at Brentry Hill near Bristol

Chapter XIII: Ancient mansions--danger of modernizing--three characters of Gothic architecture--for castles, churches, and houses--Corsham House--mixing characters, how far allowable--Port Eliot--remarks on Grecian and Gothic architecture, extracted from the Red Book in the Library of Magdalen College, Oxford--example of additions to the Gothic mansion of Ashton Court, pp. 187-188 ff.

Corsham House

[Chapter XIII, continued], pp. 189-192

Port Eliot St. Germains. [State A]

Port Eliot St. Germains. [State B]

[Chapter XIII, continued], pp. 193-200 ff.

Ashton-Court

[Chapter XIII, continued], pp. 201-202 ff.

Map of Bayham

Chapter XIV: Application of gardening and architecture united in the formation of a new place--example from Bayham--river--lake--the house--character--observations on Grecian houses--characteristic architecture--external Gothic not incompatible with comfort--how far it should prevail internally, pp. 203-208

General view of Bayham. [State A]

General view of Bayham. [State B]

Entrance front plan of Bayham as proposed

[Chapter XIV, continued], pp. 209-212

Hall for a Gothic mansion

Chapter XV: Conclusion--concerning colour--new theory of colours and shadows, by Dr. Milner--application of the same--harmony--discord--contrast--difficulty of comparisons between art and nature, pp. 213-214

Theory of colours and shadows, Milner, Isaac, 1750-1820 pp. 214-222

[Index] Index of the subjects contained in each chapter

[Index] List of plates

[Marbled pages]

[Cover]


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