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The craftsman
Vol. XXII, Number 4 (July 1912)

Ornamental stumps,   p. 453 PDF (459.3 KB)


Page 453


ORNAMENTAL STUMPS
the way of windbreak planting. Artemisia
or sage-brush has been used to some extent
in New Mexico, but, on account of the low
growth of this species-about 4 feet-
hedges, to be of any real service, must be
placed at intervals of not over IOO feet.
Osage orange will thrive in the river bot-
toms, and would, perhaps, with careful cul-
tivation, grow in much of the country
where "dry farming" is practiced. Alliga-
tor juniper and pifion will furnish winter
protection in the dry climate of the lower
elevations.
  In California windbreaks are more or less
extensively used, especially by fruit grow-
ers; eucalyptus, Monterey cypress and Mon-
terey pine giving excellent results in this
part of the country.
  The right kind of a windbreak correctly
placed and properly handled is a source of
both comfort and profit, and will add much
to the attractiveness of any farm or rural
home. The prejudice found in some local-
ities is based, invariably, on one of two
things: experience with poorly planned and
poorly administered windbreaks, or a fail-
ure to comprehend the current as well as the
eventual profit derived. The United States
Forest Service is doing much to educate the
country to a realization of the value anw
beauty of windbreaks, and promptly extends
assistance in the way of advice to anyone
contemplating their planting. This fact
should be appreciated by all farmers who
wish to improve their land in this way, and
who need practical and helpful suggestions
from an authoritative source.
COTTONWOOD GROVE AT DUNCAN, NEBRASKA, RATHER
CLOSELY PLANTED AND NOT VERY EFFICIENT, BUT
VERY GOOD FROM TIMBER STANDPOINT.
ORNAMENTAL STUMPS
PON a lawn not far from me are
         two stumps that have been turned
         into things of beauty. They were
         cut off smooth on top, and on each
was placed a potted sword fern, which, hav-
ing considerable shade from nearby trees
and plenty of water, had grown to enor-
mous size. About the roots of the stump a
fine-leaved ivy or woodbine had   been
planted and this quickly wrapped itself over
the unsightly, decaying wood.
  If a stump is old and soft in the center
the top may be hollowed out and filled with
CONIFEROUS WINDBREAK WITH WHITE PINE.
earth, and in this many woodloving ferns or
plants may be grown, the spengeri being
especially adapted to such culture.
  Many landscape gardeners prefer to leave
tall branchless tree trunks upon a lawn,
using them as trellises for ivies or vines.
                                      453


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