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Gustav Stickley (ed.) / The craftsman
Vol. XIV, Number 4 (July 1908)

von Rydingsvärd, Karl
The art of woodcarving: a practical lesson for the beginner,   pp. 436-441 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page 436


THE ART OF WOODCARVING: A PRACTICAL
LESSON FOR THE BEGINNER (ILLUSTRATED
BY AUTHOR), BY KARL VON RYDINGSVARD
HOSE who wish to acquire only
      a smattering of knowledge of
      the various crafts will probably
      not be greatly attracted by the
art of wood carving, for there is too
much hard work connected with it for
it ever to become popular as a fad. But
to those who are willing to devote regu-
larly a little time and energy to carving
it offers limitless possibilities, and much
can be accomplished even by students
who have not the opportunity to gain
technical instruction. Indeed, better
work can be done by giving even an
hour's time at home every day than by
studying spasmodically with a teacher
and doing nothing between times. The
knowledge of the handling of tools and
"THE DESIGN FROM THE STJ
BE APPLIED TO SOMETHIN
of the grain of woods can be acquired
only by actual experience, although of
course it is a great help to the student
to be able to watch the methods of a
skilful worker.
  An elaborate outfit for carving is en-
tirely unnecessary., A bench which will
answer every purpose can be nailed to-
gether by any one who is able to handle
a saw and hammer. But it must be
made of heavy wood, and the top should
be at least an inch and a half thick, and
should project beyond the frame five
inches in front, to allow space for at-
taching clamps. It must be rigid enough
so that there will be no jarring when
heavy work is going on. A top forty
inches long and twenty-seven inches
           wide will be large enough
even for big pieces, and a
height of forty-one inches
from the floor will suit the
.average person. Twelve
tools are sufficient for sim-
ple work, and a good selec-
tion is as follows, the num-
ber indicating the shape of
the tool and the fraction its
size: (See tool chart, page
441.)
  Number one, half inch;
number three, one-eighth,
three - eighths and five-
eighths; number five, one-
quarter and one-half; num-
ber six, five-eighths; num-
ber seven, three-eighths;
number nine, one-quarter;
number eleven, three-thirty-
seconds and three-six-
teenths; and number forty-
five, three-eighths.
  The grinding of these
tnool shoul~d he done hv
ART SHOULD
G USEFU."   some one who has a prac-
436


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