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Bishop, J. Leander (John Leander), 1820-1868 / A history of American manufactures from 1608 to 1860 : exhibiting the origin and growth of the principal mechanic arts and manufactures, from the earliest colonial period to the adoption of the Constitution ; and comprising annals of the industry of the United States in machinery, manufactures and useful arts, with a notice of the important inventions, tariffs, and the results of each decennial census
Volume 3 (1868)

Manufactures of Rochester,   pp. 258-265


Page 258

258                      MANUFACTURES OF ROCHESTER.
MANUFACTURES OF ROCHESTER.
ROCHESTER, by reason of the splendid water-power afforded by the
Falls of the Genesee River, and its situation in the centre of a rich
agricultural district, has peculiar natural advantages for manufacturing
operations.     Its infant enterprises, and their early history, were alluded
to in the first volume of this work. In 1860 the city contained 545
manufacturing establishments, having a capital invested of $4,145,030,
employing 5,136 males, 1,431 females, and produced an annual value of
ten millions of dollars.      The principal manufactures were
No. of
Establish-                Male     Female    Value of
Manufactures.                ments.      Capital.     hands.    hands.   Product.
Agricultural implements...................  5......  $258,500......  88......  ......  $173,750
Alcohol............................................I   120,000......  9......  ......  155,000
Brewing  (1)......................................14   171,600  .....  57......  ......  237,840
Cabinet ware..........................         79,350......  *256......  ......  137,135
Carriages.................................W .....  6......  65,800......  23......  ......  72,650
Cars  ................................................  1......  25,000......  5S......  ......  60.000
Chairs..............................................  3   40,300......  102......  ......  177,600
Cigars and tobacco............................4   20,500 .....  51......  ......  85,560
clothing  .........................................38   336,600......  800......  735......  1,156,403
Coffee and spices.......................   I......  15,000   ......     ......   38,700
Confectionery  ..................................3   14,000   23......   ......   55,800
Cotton goods....................................1   115,000 .....  40......  135......  85,000
D istilling  ........................................  3......  25,000  .....  7......  ......  73,930
Flour  (2) .. ......................................19   900,000......  ......  ......  2,563,425
Hardware and tools........................... 10 .  119,900......  209......  ......  150,503
Harness.......... .................................11   8,600......  34......  ......  46,650
Iron  founding .  .... ..........................  2   40,000   65......  ......  70,000
Iron  railing  ..................................... 2   9,000......  11......  ......  19,000
(1) In this item the census-takers erred greatly, or the product of 1860 was much below
the average. The more reliable statistics of this branch are as follows:
14 Lager beer breweries, product 60,000 barrels, worth a $5  . . . . . $300,000
4 Ale and porter breweries, product 55,000 barrels, a $7  . . . . . .      385,000
Malt.........      ..............     ....... . .      . . . .      . .  80,000
Total product . . . . . . . . . $765,000
Longmuir's Brewery, in Rochester, is probably the largest west of Troy.       It was
a few years since destroyed by fire, but has been rebuilt, with all the latest improvements.
The building is 125 feet long and 100 feet deep, and the total area of the floors is 62,500
square feet. A powerful hydraulic apparatus, driven by water-power, throws water to all
parts of the building, thus ensuring great cleanliness, as well as a precaution against fire.
(2) In the statistics of this branch the census-takers have erred more seriously even
than in Brewing. There are 24 mills, having 122 run of stone, that average daily 6100
barrels of Flour for 150 days, or 915,000 barrels a year-which, supposing Flour to b3
worth $6 per barrel, would make the product $5,490,000. Add to this the coarser grains,
feed, etc., and it wcill be seen that the milling interest of Rochester ranges from six to
eight millions of dollars a year.


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