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Chippendale, Thomas (1718-1779) / The gentleman and cabinet-maker's director: being a large collection of the most elegant and useful designs of household furniture in the Gothic, Chinese and modern taste.
(1754)

General proportions,   pp. 1-3


Page 1

THE 
GENERAL 
PROPORTIONS 
OF THE 
TU
S
CAN 
ORDER. 
PLATE 
I. 
No. I. 
TAKE any Height proposed for this Order, and divide it 
into five equal 
Parts, one of those Parts shall be the Height of
 the Pedestal according 
to the small Division of the Scale, on the left 
Hand; the other four 
Parts above must be divided into five Parts, according to 
the outmost Line on the 
left Hand; the upper fifth Part shall be the Height of the 
Entablature, and the 
other four Parts betwixt the Pedestal and Entablature, shall 
be the Height of the 
Column, including its Base and Capital; and this Height being 
divided into seven 
Parts, one of those Parts will be the Diameter of the Column, 
which Diameter is 
divided into sixty equal Parts, and is called a Module; 
and this will serve to set off 
all the Mouldings for this Order.   You have all the Particulars 
of the Mouldings 
at large on the right Hand; the Base and Capital are each 
in Height a Semi-diame- 
ter of the Column; the Column must be divided into three 
equal Parts betwixt the 
Capital and Base, and from the Top of the lower Division 
it is diminished 1/5 of 
its Semi-diameter on each Side.  The Method of diminishing 
the Column is ex- 
plained in the middle Scheme; the Breadth of the Die of
 the Pedestal is deter- 
mined by the Projection of the Base of the Column. 
THE 
GENERAL
 PROPORTIONS 
OF THE 
DORICK ORDER. 
PLATE 
II.
 No. 2. 
TAKE any Height upon a straight Line, as in the TUSCAN 
Order, and di- 
vide it into five equal Parts, one of them shall be 
the Height of the Pe- 
destal; the other four Parts must be divided into five Parts,
 one of which is the 
Height of the Entablature; the remaining four Parts must 
be divided into eight 
A              
Parts,

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