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Barber, Edwin Atlee, 1851-1916 / Anglo-American pottery; old English china with American views, a manual for collectors
(1899)

Centennial designs,   pp. 153-157


Page 153

ANGLO-AMERICAN POTTERY.
CENTENNIAL DESIGNS.
It is not possible to fix exact dates marking the beginning
and ending of the manufacture of certain distinct classes of
Anglo-American pottery. It is sufficient for all purposes,
however, to know that the production of Liverpool cream
ware, with black, brown, green and red printed designs relat-
ing to America, extended over a period of some twenty-five
years, from about 1790 to 1815. The black printed and lus-
tered cream ware and the dark blue china of the Staffordshire
potteries began to take the place of the Liverpool products
soon after the war of 1812, and blue printed china continued
to be manufactured until about 1830, covering practically a
period of fifteen years. This ware, in turn, was gradually su-
perseded by the Staffordshire crockery, with prints in various
colors-red, green, light blue, black, brown and purple-which
was made in great abundance for at least fifteen years longer,
or down to about 1840. The china produced after that time
is regarded by collectors as too modern to deserve special at-
tention, yet there were a few designs prepared by English pot-
ters in commemoration of the Centennial Exposition of 1876,
which, sooner or later, will be in demand on account of their
historical value.
MESSRS. F. & R. PRATT & CO., OF THE FENTON POT-
TERIES, STOKE-ON-TRENT.
-Designs in Colors. Border, Solid Groundwork-Magenta,
Turquoise Blue, etc.-with Margin of Filigree Gold Work.-
"The State House in Philadelphia, 1776."
"Philadelphia Public Buildings, 1876."
Similar designs were made by other English potters, among
which may be mentioned:
Memorial Hall (Art Building, Centennial).
153


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