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The craftsman
Volume XXVII, Number 5 (February 1915)

Planting your garden to attract the birds,   p. 563 PDF (479.2 KB)


Page 563


PLANTING TO ATTRACT BIRDS
LANTING YOUR GARDEN TO
rTRACT THE BIRDS
IRDS, as well as trees, shrubs and
    flowers, add to the charm of a coun-
    try home. Birds, also, are practically
    essential to the welfare of trees, and
 selecting the plants for your home
)unds it is well to include among them
se which will particularly attract the
le feathered folk.
By consulting the following lists, the
*dener will know what plants to choose
the benefit of certain kinds of birds.
st we are giving the names of birds that
d upon the fruits of the trees, shrubs and
es enumerated later. The numbers in-
ated in front of the bird names will be
nd in the second list after the names of
plants that attract them.
            THE BIRDs
 Blackbird, 2 bluebird, 3 bobolink, 4 cat-
d, 5 cedarbird, 6 chickadee, 7 crow, 8
koo, 9 finch, io grosbeak, ii grouse, 12
ilJ* ;un. o i9 t         ±3 1J;fl flL 1 '.A
jJ _j 2      yL u 1.I. t 1  L I. l, I. L - J"'.;.. .I..
phoebe, 17 quail, j8 robin, 19 sparrow, 20
swallow, 21 tanager, 22 thrasher, 23 thrush,
24 vireo, 25 warbler, 26 woodpecker.
               THE PLANTS
   Shad Bush (Amelanchier botryapium)
 attracts birds numbered I, 2, 5, 7, 10, 12,
 15, i8, 21, 26.
   Woodbine   (Ampelopsis, including   A.
 quinquefolia, A. Engelmanni     and   A.
 Veitchii), 2, 7, II, 14, 17, 18, 19, 26.
   Spice Bush (Benzoin odoriferum), ii,
 17. 19, 26.
   Barberry (Berberis, including B. Thun-
bergii, B.' vulgaris and B. vulgaris pur-
purea), 5, 7, II, 14, 17, 18, 19, 26.
  Bittersweet (Celastrus, including C. pani-
culata and C. scandens), 2, II, 17, 18, 26.
  Nettletree (Celtis occidentalis), I, 2, 5,
7, I8, 26.
  Cherry (Cerasus, including C. avium, C.
Pennsylvanicum and C. serotina), I, 4, 5,
7, 10, 12, 14, 15, 18, 22, 25, 26.
  Cornel or Dogwood (Curnus, including C.
alba, C. alternifolia, C. Florida, C. pani-
culata, C. sanguinea, C. sericea and C.
stolonifera), I, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, II, 12, 14,
17, I8, 19, 20, 22, 24, 26.
  Hawthorn (Crataegus including C. coc-
cinea, C. cordata, C. crus-galli and C. oxy-
acantha), 7, II, 12, 18.
  Strawberry or Spindle-tree (Euonymus,
including all varieties), 2, 18, 19, 26.
   Holly (Ilex, including I. opaca and I.
 verticillata), 2, 7, 17, 18, 26.
   Juniper or Cedar (Juniperus, including J.
 communis and J. Virginiana), 2, 5, 7, 9,
 10, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19, 23, 25, 26.
   Mulberry   (Morus, including M. alba
 pendula, M. Tatarica and M. var. New
 American), I, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, II, 12, 14,
 16, 17, 18, 19, 21, 22, 24, 26.
   Bayberry (Myrica cerifera), I, 6, 7, II,
 14, 17, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26.
   Sour Gum or Tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica),
 4, 7, II, 12, 18, 22, 26.
   Mountain Ash (Pyrus, including P. Sor-
 bus Americana, P. Sorbus aucuparia, P.
 Sorbus pendula and P. Sorbus quercifolia),
 2, 5, 9, IO, II, 18, 19, 26.
   Buckthorn (Rhamnus, including R. Caro-
 linianus or frangula, R. catherticus and R.
 crenata), 4, 5, IO, 12, 13, 14, 18, 22.
   Sumach (Rhus, including R. glabra and
 R. typhina), I, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, II, 12, 14,
 17, 18, 19, 20, 22, 24, 25, 26.
   Rose (Rosa: hips of the following varie-
 ties are eaten by many species of birds: R.
 blanda, R. Carolina, R. lucida, R. multiflora
 Japonica, R. nitida, R. Rubiginosa, R. ru-
 brifolia, R. rugosa, R. rugosa alba, R. seti-
 gera, R. spinosissima, R. Wichuraiana).
   Elder (Sambucus, including S. Cana-
densis, S. nigra, S. nigra aurea and S. race-
mosa or pubens), I, 2, 4, 5, 7, IO, II, 12,
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 22, 24, 26.
   Blueberry or Huckleberry (Vaccinium,
including V. corymbosum and V. Pennsyl-
vanicum), 4, 5, 7, Ii, 12, 14, 18, 19, 26.
   Viburnum (including V. acerfolium, V.
cassinoides, V. dentatum, V. lantana, V.
Lentago and V. opulus), 2, 5, 7, II, 17, 18,
19, 22, 25, 26.
  Grape (Vites, including V. heterophylla,
V. Labrusca and V. riparia), I, 5, 7, II, 12,
14, 17, 18, 19, 22, 26.
  When the birds have been coaxed to one's
garden by the planting of some of the vines
and shrubs listed above, the next thing is to
encourage them to stay and build their nests.
If there are few trees or sheltered nooks
where they would feel safe in making
homes, a delightful plan is to construct,
from hollow bits of log, twigs, branches or
a ball of twine, little bird houses which can
be hung under a protecting eave, nailed to a
porch post or a pole in the garden, or half
hidden among the shrubbery. If the gar-
dener has not the time or inclination to make
these tiny dwellings at home, they can be
purchased for a reasonable sum.
                                     563


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