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Jones, Owen, 1809-1874. / Examples of Chinese ornament selected from objects in the South Kensington Museum and other collections.
(1867)

Description of the plates,   pp. 9-15 ff.


Page 9


DESCRIPTION OF THE PLATES.
PLATE I.
Ornamental Title, arranged from a painted china
dish.
PLATE II.
This plate is taken from a very fine Vase of blue-
and-white china.  The large flowers are arranged
all over the surface of the Vase in equilateral tri-
angles, and are united by one continuous main stem,
throwing off smaller masses arranged triangularly.
The introduction of the ground colour in the centre
of the flowers is very valuable, and materially helps
the repose of the composition.
PLATE III.
This plate is arranged from a blue-and-white
china Basin, and shows half the circumference of
the basin developed. The four pear-shaped masses
are very effective. The etched outline lowers on
the dark ground are after the Indian manner; so
also is the general arrangement of the pendant
ornament, except that the scrolls have their ter-
minations so peculiarly Chinese.
PLATE IV.
This plate is taken from a large Vase, similar
in general arrangement to that from which Plate II.
is taken, but the forms of the Ornament are much
less pure. The composition consists of three bats
placed triangularly, crossed by three flowers similarly
arranged in the opposite direction: these are all
united by a continuous stem, throwing off other
masses of conventional form.
PLATE V.
A similar composition on a dark ground. Here
repose is obtained by the etching in the ground-
colour, on the leaves and flowers.
PLATE VI.
Part of a pendant Ornament round the top of a
magnificent blue-and-white china cistern.  In the
upper border the lines run in one direction round
C
I.,
the bowl. In the lower, one continuous main stem
runs through the general forms, embracing all the
flowers, which are geometrically arranged. The
broad blue line which forms the boundary of the
composition is also continuous; and in the form
of a pendant arch recalls a form which is common
to the Arabian, Persian, Moresque, and indeed all
Oriental art. The treatment of the shading of the
flowers is also Indian in character.
PLATE VII.
From a blue-and-white china Dish. Again in
this example we see a Persian influence in the
flowers round the edge, and in the form of the ex-
ternal rim of the dish.
PLATE VIII.
From a blue-and-white china Bottle. Here we
have continuous stems running round the bottle,
throwing off flowers right and left, fitting into each
other as it were, and yet triangulation is never
lost sight of.
PLATE IX.
Borders from blue-and-white china Bottles
PLATE X.
Borders from Vases in cloisonne enamel. The
same instinct of triangulation may be observed in
the colouring of the ornament.
PLATE XI.
The same principles which are exhibited in
Plate II. are to be seen in this specimen from a
Bowl in cloisonne enamel. The large flowers are
arranged in triangles, crossed by smaller flowers in
the opposite direction, and all connected by a con-
tinuous stem throwing off leaves and stalks to fill
up the ground; all geometrically arranged, and
yet not in a manner so apparent as to interfere
with the freedom of the composition. The system
of triangulation is still further kept up in the
colouring.  On the left the purple flower is the
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