University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Digital Library for the Decorative Arts and Material Culture

Page View

Stickley, Gustav, 1858-1942. / Craftsman homes
(1909)

The treatment of wall spaces so that a room is in itself complete and satisfying,   pp. 144-148


Page 144

THE TREATMENT OF WALL SPACES SO THAT A
ROOM IS IN ITSELF COMPLETE AND SATISFYING
SO much of the success of any scheme of
      interior decoration  or  furnishing de-
      pends upon the right treatment of the
      wall spaces that we deem it best to take
up this subject more in detail than it has been
possible to do in the general descriptions of
the houses or even of the separate rooms.
  It goes  without  saying that we   like the
friendly presence of much wood and are very
sensible of the charm of beams, wainscots and
built-in furnishings which are a part of the
house itself and so serve to link it closer to
the needs of daily life.  Bare wall spaces, or
those covered   with pictures  and  draperies
which are put there merely for the purpose of
covering them, are very hard to live with.
But wall spaces that provide bookcases, cup-
hoards, built-in seats for windows, fireside and
ether nooks are used in a way that not only
gives to them the kind of beauty and interest
which is theirs by right, but makes them of
practical value in the life of the household, as
such  furnishings    mean  great convenience.
economy of space and the doing away with
many pieces of furniture which might other-
wise be really needed, but which might give
the appearance of crowding that is so disturb-
ing to the restfulness of a room.
  When the walls are rightly treated,    it is
amazing how little ftirniture and how few or-
naments and pictures are required to make a
room seem comfortable and homelike.      The
treatment of wall spaces in itself may seem
but a detail, yet it is the keynote not only of
the whole character of the house but of the
people who live in it.   We hear much criti-
cism of the changing and remodeling which
is deemed necessary every year or two because
a house must be ³brought tip to date¹ or be-
catise the owners ³grow so tired of seeing one
thing all the time.²  Yet both of these reasons
are absolutely valid so far as they go, for the
Fnblished in The Craftsman, October, 1904.
A HIGh  WAIN5COT MADE WITh  REcEssEs TO HOLD CHOICE BITS OF METAL OR EARTHENWARE.
THIS 15 ESPEcIALLY
BEAUTIFUL IF cARRIED OUT IN cHESTNUT OR GUM\VOOL TREATEO IN THE CRAFTSMAN
MANNER.
144


Go up to Top of Page