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Stickley, Gustav, 1858-1942. / Craftsman homes
(1909)

The natural garden: some things that can be done when nature is followed instead of thwarted,   pp. 113-118


Page 113

THE NATURAL GARDEN: SOME THINGS THAT CAN
BE DONE WHEN NATURE IS FOLLOWED INSTEAD
OF THWARTED
      A KING a garden is not unlike build-
X/I      ing a home, because the first thing
LYE.     to be considered is the creation ot
         that indefinable feeling of restful-
ness and harmony which alone makes for per-
manence.   Therefore, in planning a garden
that we mean to live with all our lives, it is
best to let Nature alone just as far as possible,
following her suggestions and helping her to
carry out her plans by adjusting our own to
them, rather than attempting to introduce a
conventional element into the landscape.
  We have already explained in detail the im-
portance of building a house so that it becomes
a part of its natural surroundings  of planning
it so that its form harmonizes with the general
contour of the site upon which it stands and
also of the surrounding country, and of using
local materials and natural colors, wherever
it is possible, so that the house may be brought
into the closest relationship with its natural
surroundings.  But no matter how well plan-
ned the house may be, or how completely in
keeping with the country, the climate and the
life that is to be lived in it, the ~vhole sense
of home peace and comfort is gone if the gar-
den is left to the mercy of the average gard-
ener, whose   chief ambition usually is to
achieve trim walks, faultless flower-beds and
neatly barbered shrubs, and whose apprecia-
tion of wild natural beauty is small.
  To give a real sense or peace and satisfac-
tion a garden must be a place in which we can
wandler and lounge, pick flowers at our will
an(l invite our souls, and we can do none of
these if we have the feeling that trees, shrubs
an(l flowers were put there arbitrarily and ac<
cordling to a set, artificial pattern, instead of
being allowed to grow up as Nature meant
them to do.  Therefore, knowing the vital im-
portance of the right kind of garden to the
general scheme, we have given here some ex-
amples of the natural treatment of moderate-
slze(l grounds, trusting that they may be sug-
gestive to home builders. The house shown in
the illustrations was built by an artist out in a
pasture lot and the garden that has been en-
couraged to grow up around it has more of the
A HOME \VHERE THE SURROUNDINGS HAVE BEEN LEFT AS   NEARLY  NATURAL AS  POSSIBLE
 THE DWELLING OF
MR. FREDERICK STYMETZ IAMB.
Pieblished in The Craftsm~, January, 1908.
113


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