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Stickley, Gustav, 1858-1942. / Craftsman homes
(1909)

A log house that will serve either as a summer camp or a country home,   pp. 74-75


Page 74

A LOG HOUSE THAT WILL SERVE EITHER
SUMMER CAMP OR A COUNTRY HOME
So many people like log houses for sum-
       mer homes that we give here a design
       that would harmonize    with the  most
       primitive surroundings.   At the same
time it is so carefully planned and so well
constructed that it could be used as a regular
dwelling all the year round.   While the lines
of the building are simple to a degree,    all
the proportions are so calculated and the de-
tails of the construction so carefully observed
that,  with all  this  simplicity and freedom
from pretense, there is no suggestion of bare-
ness or crudity.  It is essentially a log house
for woodland life, and it looks just that; yet
it is a warm, comfortable, roomy building per-
fectly drained and ventilated and, with proper
construction, ought to last for many genera-
tions.
   As the  first step  towards  securing good
drainage and also saving the lower logs of
the   wall from decay,   there is an  excellent
foundation built of stone or cement<accord-
ing to the material most easily and econom-
icallv obtained,<and this foundation is quite
as high as it would be in any dwellina built
of the conventional materials in the conven-
tional way.  But as the appearance of such a
foundation  would spoil the  whole effect of
the house by separating it from the ground
on which it stands, it is almost entirely con-
cealed by terracing the soil up to the top of
it and therefore  to the  level   of the porch
floors.  The first log of the walls rest directly
tipon this foundation and is just far enouah
above the ground to prevent rotting.   By this
device perfect healthfulness is secured so far
as good drainage   is  concerned,  and  at the
same time the wide low house of logs appears
to rest upon the ground in the most primitive
way.
  The logs used in building should have the
bark stripped off and then be stained to a dull
grayish brown that approaches as closely as
possible to the color of the bark that has been
removed.    This does away entirely with the
danger of rotting, which is unavoidable when
the bark is left on, and the stain removes the
raw, glaring whiteness of the peeled logs and
restores  them   to a  color that   harmonizes
with their surrotindings.  The best logs for
this ptlrpose are  from trees   of the  second
growth, which are easily obtained almost any-
where.    They should be from nine to twelve
inches in   diameter and  should be   carefully
ASA
Published in The Craftsman, March, 1907.
     EXTERIOR OF LOG HOUSE, 5HOWING DECORATIVE USE OF THE PROJECTiNG ENDS
OF PARTITION LOGS.
74


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