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Stickley, Gustav, 1858-1942. / Craftsman homes
(1909)

A comfortable and convenient house for the suburbs or the country,   pp. 32-35


Page 32

                                         I
A COMFORTABLE AND CONVENIENT HOUSE FOR
THE SUBURBS OR THE COUNTRY
BELIEVING as we (10 that the happiest
       and healthiest life is that in the country,
       we take especial pleasure in tlesigning
       houses that are (lefinitely meant to be
surrounded by large grounds that slope off into
the fields, meadows and orchards all around.
Such a house has always the effect of taking
all the room  it needs, and this will be found
important   when  we   come  to analyze      the
elements that go toward making the restful
charm of a home.    The sense of privacy and
freedom from intrusion that is conveyed by
English homes with their ample gardens an(l
buildings placed well back from the street is
a quality which we badly need in our Amer-
ican home life as a relief from the rush and
crowding outside.
   Although the foim of this house is straight
and square, its rather low, broad proportions
and the contrasting materials used in its con-
structioi~ take away all sense of severity.  The
walls of the lower story and the chimneys are
of hard-burned red brick and the upper walls
are  of Portland  cement  plaster with      half-
timber construction.   The  foundation,     steps
an(l porch parapets are of split stone laid up
in  (lark cement  and the  roof    is tiled. Of
course, this is only a suggestion for materials,
as the house would he equally well adapted to
almost any form of construction, from stone
to shingles.   The coloring also may be made
rich and warm or cool and subdued, as de-
manded by the     surroundings.    One  feature-
that is especially in accordance with Crafts-
man ideas is the way in which the half-timbers
on the upper story are used.     While we like
half-timber   construction, it is  an article of
faith with us that it should be made entirely
³probable²    that is, that the timbers should be¹
so place(l that they might easily belong to the
real construction of the house.    In a building
that  is  entirely designed  by    ourselves we
adhere very strictly to this rule, varying it
only when the taste of the owner requires a
more   elaborate  use of  timbers,  such   as is
shown    in the house illustrated on page 28.
Another    feature of typical Craftsman     con-
struction  is well illustrated in  the windows
used in this house.  It will be noted that they
are double-hung in places where they are ex<
Published in The Craftsman, May, 1917.
     VIEW OF TIlE FRONT, GIVING A GOOD IDEA OF THE EFFECT OF BEICE ANT) CEMENT
WAILS WITh  TILED ROOF.


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