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Stickley, Gustav, 1858-1942. / Craftsman homes
(1909)

A plain house that will last for generations and need but few repairs,   pp. 16-18


Page 16

A PLAIN HOUSE THAT WILL LAST FOR GENERA
TIONS AND NEED BUT FEW REPAIRS
MOST           of  the Craftsman    houses  are
        designed   for an environment which
        admits    of plenty of ground     or at
        least of a large garden around them,
but this one<while of course at its best in
such  surroundings,<would     serve   admirably
for a dwelling to be built on an ordinary city
lot large enough to accommodate a house thirty
feet square.  Seen from the exterior, the house
shows a simplicity and thoroughness of con-
struction which makes for the greatest dura-
bility and minimizes the necessity for repairs.
Also the rooms on both floors are so arranged
as to utilize to the best advantage every inch
of space and to afford the greatest facility for
communication; a plan that tends to lighten
by many degrees the burden of housekeeping.
  In looking over the plan of the interior, we
would suggest one modification which is more
in accord with the later Craftsman houses.   It
will he noticed that the doors leading from
the hall into the living room and dining room
are of the ordinary size.  We have found the
feeling of space and freedom throughout the
rooms intended for the common life of the
family  so   much  more    attractive than  the
shutting off of each room into a separate com-
partment. so to speak, that were we to revise
this plan iii the light of our later experience,
we would    widen these openings so that the
partitions would either be taken out entirely
or else be suggested merely by a panel and post
exten(ling only two or three feet from the wall
an(l open at the top after the fashion of so
many of the Craftsman interiors.    This (levice
serves to break the   space pleasantly by the
introduction of a structural feature which is
always diecorative and yet to leave unhampered
the space which should be clear and open.
  While we advocate the utmost economy of
~~)ace and urge simplicity as to furni~hing, we
nevertheless  make  it a point to   render im-
possible even a pa5sing impression of barren-
ness or monotony.    As we have said, this is
partly a matter of woodwork, general color
scheme and interesting structtiral features that
make each room a beautiftil     thing in itse If,
indlepen(lent of any furnishing.   I3tit also we
realize the never ending charm of irregularity
in arrangement, that is, of having the rooms
so placed and nooks and corners so abundant
that the whole cannot he taken in at one glance.
  In this case the simple oblong of the living
room is broken by the window seat on one
 Vubhslied in  ŒI hc draft.,man, July, 1905.
EXTERIOR VIEW sHOWING STRUCTURAL LISE OF TIMBERS ON UPPER STORY AND EFFECT
OF BUNGALOW ROOF.
16


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