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Alvares, Manuel, 1526-1583, et al. / Ethiopia Minor and a geographical account of the Province of Sierra Leone : (c. 1615)
(1990)

Ethiopia Minor: a geographical description of the Province and Kingdom of the Jalofo Heathon, part I, chapter I: the location and fertility of the land, and the nature and occupations of its inhabitants,   pp. [unnumbered]-14 ff.


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fail to be productive; and thi   without the labour of agriculture
being so necessary here. For the Jalofo man, though almost without
agricul tural knowledge, has, thanks to the easy clearing of the ground
and a small contribution of rain from the heavens, so good a harvest
in his fields from four or five good showers that he considers further
labour pointless. The district nearest the sea lacks running streams
and springs, which are so uncommon that they are found only in a
few places; and such wells as there are in the land go so deep that
regularly they reach 100 fathoms. This is the reason why the stock
graze in distant lands, an i the chief reason for the lack of forest,
the great disadvantage of the district.    For as the lack of /f.3/
springs and streams makes the district less valuable, so the lack of
green t ces makes it also melancholy and sad. However, there are some
palm-trees, but in number so few that they cannot make the land much
more agreeable.
Nevertheleas the country is rich in stock of various kinds;
cattle, goats, and sheep - some coming from the interior; farmyard
hens, which are very tasty but smaller than ours; camels in large
numbers; and horses, generally small ones, though they do have a few
Arab horses which the lords and those better circumstanced buy from
the Moors who trade here. They also do not lack those animals one-of
which the Lord employed on his solemn entrance into Jerusalem, indeed
they possess many of them; yet they are of no use to the people of
the land, or to the more noble Jalofos, because none will ride them,
considering this an unworthy practice. Among the wild animals in
the country there are lions, tigers, leopards, deer, gazelle, civet-
cats, foxes, mongooses, squirrels and different sorts of monkeys.
Among the birds arc ostriches, parrots and little ones with four wings,
the two extra emerging, beyond the bend of the win,, as they fly.
Although the land has these creatures in such abundance and is inhabited


 


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