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Alvares, Manuel, 1526-1583, et al. / Ethiopia Minor and a geographical account of the Province of Sierra Leone : (c. 1615)
(1990)

Part two: The Province of Sierra Leone, chapter 1: the name, situation and bounds of this province and the nature of the land,   pp. 1-18


Page 8

a kind of husk.   (Other fruit trees are) abenche, sweet plums, black
plums, the velvet-tree, and jagatu.   The wild grapes, even if grafted
-or cultivated, never became as good as ours,     etc.  Without discussing
l
here the real palm tree, /f.49v/ let us refer to the false palms.    One
---sort is called poche, which is used to roof houses and from which wine
    U
''is drawn; and ,another sort is called tara de bordro,*and from this a
(f).a
large quantity of maguenche   )" is drawn, which is also used as wine
here. From this tara de bordaZ they make the gudenhos or containers foil
i
- cola, the baskets to sift and clean rice in the same way as we do with
- -our sieves, aresf, and straw mats.  The nachul used to weave these good4|1
is obtained from the leaves of the tree. | U
Now let us speak of the medicinal trees.    Amongst these is the cede  --
the animpo, a tree producing copal, an effective poultice for chills of 
   I
<any part of the body.    The bark of the mana, dried in the sun'and grounCII
into a powder, is good to alleviate headaches, when laid on the temples;
I
also for itch and many-other disorders.    A very tasty medicinal oil, go|l
for chills, is made from majuta.   The oil made from the stone of the   
 1|,
chaveo is very fine, and a bitter oil important for various uses is
extracted from the fruits of a tree called ixto: the fruits grow in hus 
   *
Now it is the turn of the citrus-trees, such as orange-trees, lemon-tret
   U
and lime-trees. The land is fairly well-stocked with these, although
everything to do with their cultivation was brought here by foreigners
lived in the country in former times. The same applies to a quantity on*
sugar canes that are here. Eren though the woods are full of all sorts ot
trees, plants,and poison herbs, the number of health-giving and medicinal
ones is almost infinite, and if the local herbalists were able to write4
t
they could write great tomes about them. Of spices, although there is no
Malucca clove or Ceylon cinnamon, this Province has mantevilha, which calt
be used instead of saffron; red and black malagueta, which are used as
pepper and as clove, and are so health-giving that the heathen use them
in their medicines and on occasions with their food; cola, whose coolnets
lessens the burning taste of the peppers and which acts against poison,
although here they employ even more commonly taca. This is the bark of I
certain small tree used for seasoning, normally with cola, but sometimes
(e) Perhaps they would be as good as ours if grafted.
(f) Maguenche is an inferior palm-tree from which is drawn the best winj
51 is


 


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