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Almada, André Alvares d', fl. 1594, et al. / Brief treatise on the rivers of Guinea
Part I (1984)

Chapter 11. Which discusses the Rio Grande, the land of the Beafares, and the customs of the Beafares. [translated text],   pp. 102-114 ff.


Page 103

2.       Pronl here the Dejagos Islauds stretchi out over lthic sea, as fair
as
Purple Island,  hIIchI is the last one jo- ao-ying im;areds. These isl~an.h3s
lie facS~n the entrance to the river, life a wall, across it.  Only little
ships canl sail among the islaads because of the b-vui~ss an-d shallos. Often
depths of tenrty fa ~homs are iE-mdiately followed by a sounding of four
fatho:ns, and next minute the ship is high aad drLy. But there are channels
between the islanis, Imowim to pilots, along which ships can sail.
3.       The land of the Beafares begins, as stated, at Bulama Point. This
consists of several rocky reefs, between which there are places where one
can anchor   After Bulama Point come some beaches of waite sand, called
the Little Beaches. Here ships can also anchor quite close to the land,
since the bottom is free from rock"-s. Yet in the 'nidleII o the rivr
t here
is no suitable bottom, because the river-bed rises steeply. Very often
ships run aground because they cannot find a bottom to hold their anchor.
Following, the Sandbanks of Bisegue comes a shallow which lies on the East
side, next to the land of the Deafares called Bisegue, and this shallow
is called the Shallo'.i of Honra do Monteiro. The sandbanks we have just
mentioned lie in the middle of the river when proceeding inland from
Bulama. Point.
4.       Higher up the river on each side is the land of the Beafares, a
nation of blacks who possess very handsome features, both the men and the
women. The river forms two channels; the first carries on to Guinala, a
land of the same Beafares.   To the North of this channel lies another land
of the Beafares called Mompara, and to the cast of the ehamel another
again, called Bixiloli. These territories belong to nobles, who have as
many possessions as the king himself, although they Aon him as lord.
Their status resembles that of a duke. These three nobles - (the rulers)
of Balole, Mo-)mpara ound Dixiloli - are, as I say, rulers of duixedoms or
earldo.-se


 


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