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Alvares, Manuel, 1526-1583, et al. / Ethiopia Minor and a geographical account of the Province of Sierra Leone : (c. 1615)
(1990)

Chapter 8: The renowned Island of Bussis, the character and organisation of its people, the richness of the land, and the royal state of its great king,   pp. 1-9


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Chapter 8                                       |10
The renowned Island of Bussis, the character and organisation of its
people, the richness of the land, and the royal state of its great kin4
Although the greater part of this chapter will be about the celetea
King of Bussis, let us first discuss the land)    As stated at the end c
chapter 5, this beautiful island lies five leagues to the South East,'11
facing the Little Isles. Its situation is delightful and very healthylj
account of the continual breezes from the sea and the very refreshing
aspect afforded by trees of different kinds, such as palms and cibes.-
Nor does the island lack an abundance of running waters from its sprin4I|
/f.29v/  In general the inhabitants are good-looking.  They are employl
in farming and fishing, like the other heathen.  The more noble among
them wear cotton cloths, either barafulas or others obtained in normal
trade.  They are great wine-tappers.  The land abounds in milho, rice, II
beans, yams and bananas, and no less in livestock, such as cows, goats
and henstb)  The poor wear goat-skins, and if thcy lack evcn theso theyi
make use of cibe leaves, from which they weave a small sort of mat, a-dlAl[i
with this they cover themselves, as stated near the end of chapter 5
The women are employed in the usual tasks, and they weed the fields in
the appropriate seasons.
The king of Bussis is unique in that there is so much to be told
about his household and royal state, as well as his person and all his {
possessions, for the whites have turned him into a lascarim. He is well
acquainted with what comes from Spain, indeed he benefits more .from these
things here than many do there.  Heathen as he is, those who know his
lifestyle cannot but speak well of him. They say: "A good disciple of
i$
good master  " .  So let us       to make a careful examination of the
savage. His person is so dainty and sleek as a result of a variety of
delicacies and luxuries that he can readily be envied by those of this
district most dedicated to epicureanism.  As regards his manner of life,
in order to dress weil he cuts up silks and other expensive cloths, and
does this mfie lavishly than do those Spaniards who make most use of    
  t
these.  As proof it is enough to refer to the quantity of silks and other
textiles sent him by his admirers in this Guinea. He has many of these
(a) The inhabitants of this land too are Papels.
(b)  The king has large numbers of capons which are useful to him as    
-
gifts when he is giving these.


 


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